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Exercise on prescription for women aged 40-74 recruited through primary care: two year randomised controlled trial.
BMJ. 2008 Dec 11; 337:a2509.BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effectiveness of a primary care based programme of exercise on prescription among relatively inactive women over a two year period.

DESIGN

Randomised controlled trial.

SETTING

17 primary care practices in Wellington, New Zealand

PARTICIPANTS

1089 women aged 40-74 not undertaking 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on at least five days of the week

INTERVENTION

Brief physical activity intervention led by nurse with six month follow-up visit and monthly telephone support over nine months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Physical activity assessed at baseline and 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (SF-36), weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, concentrations of fasting serum lipids, glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), glucose, insulin, and physical fitness.

RESULTS

Mean age was 58.9 (SD 7) years. Trial retention rates were 93% and 89% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. At baseline, 10% of intervention participants and 11% of control participants were achieving 150 minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity a week. At 12 months rates increased to 43% and 30% and at 24 months to 39.3% and 32.8% (P<0.001), respectively. SF-36 physical functioning (P=0.03) and mental health (P<0.05) scores improved more in intervention compared with control participants, but role physical scores were significantly lower (P<0.01). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes. More falls (P<0.001) and injuries (P=0.03) were recorded in the intervention group.

CONCLUSIONS

This programme of exercise on prescription increased physical activity and quality of life over two years, although falls and injuries also increased. This finding supports the use of exercise on prescription programmes as part of population strategies to reduce physical inactivity.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ANZCTRN012605000490673.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Women's Health Research Centre, Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, PO Box 7343, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. Bev.Lawton@otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19074218

Citation

Lawton, Beverley A., et al. "Exercise On Prescription for Women Aged 40-74 Recruited Through Primary Care: Two Year Randomised Controlled Trial." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 337, 2008, pp. a2509.
Lawton BA, Rose SB, Elley CR, et al. Exercise on prescription for women aged 40-74 recruited through primary care: two year randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2008;337:a2509.
Lawton, B. A., Rose, S. B., Elley, C. R., Dowell, A. C., Fenton, A., & Moyes, S. A. (2008). Exercise on prescription for women aged 40-74 recruited through primary care: two year randomised controlled trial. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 337, a2509. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.a2509
Lawton BA, et al. Exercise On Prescription for Women Aged 40-74 Recruited Through Primary Care: Two Year Randomised Controlled Trial. BMJ. 2008 Dec 11;337:a2509. PubMed PMID: 19074218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise on prescription for women aged 40-74 recruited through primary care: two year randomised controlled trial. AU - Lawton,Beverley A, AU - Rose,Sally B, AU - Elley,C Raina, AU - Dowell,Anthony C, AU - Fenton,Anna, AU - Moyes,Simon A, Y1 - 2008/12/11/ PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/1/22/medline SP - a2509 EP - a2509 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 337 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of a primary care based programme of exercise on prescription among relatively inactive women over a two year period. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 17 primary care practices in Wellington, New Zealand PARTICIPANTS: 1089 women aged 40-74 not undertaking 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on at least five days of the week INTERVENTION: Brief physical activity intervention led by nurse with six month follow-up visit and monthly telephone support over nine months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Physical activity assessed at baseline and 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (SF-36), weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, concentrations of fasting serum lipids, glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), glucose, insulin, and physical fitness. RESULTS: Mean age was 58.9 (SD 7) years. Trial retention rates were 93% and 89% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. At baseline, 10% of intervention participants and 11% of control participants were achieving 150 minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity a week. At 12 months rates increased to 43% and 30% and at 24 months to 39.3% and 32.8% (P<0.001), respectively. SF-36 physical functioning (P=0.03) and mental health (P<0.05) scores improved more in intervention compared with control participants, but role physical scores were significantly lower (P<0.01). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes. More falls (P<0.001) and injuries (P=0.03) were recorded in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: This programme of exercise on prescription increased physical activity and quality of life over two years, although falls and injuries also increased. This finding supports the use of exercise on prescription programmes as part of population strategies to reduce physical inactivity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ANZCTRN012605000490673. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19074218/Exercise_on_prescription_for_women_aged_40_74_recruited_through_primary_care:_two_year_randomised_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://www.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19074218 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -