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Blood safety strategies for human T-cell lymphotropic virus in Europe.
Vox Sang. 2009 Feb; 96(2):104-10.VS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To prevent the blood transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), different countries have introduced anti-HTLV blood screening. Furthermore, leucoreduction of blood components has been implemented to preclude the transmission of infectious agents present in white blood cells.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS

To evaluate the current European strategies adopted to ensure the blood safety for HTLV, a European investigation spanning a period from 2003 to 2008 was carried out.

RESULTS

In 2003, of the 23 included countries, 11 performed anti-HTLV screening, four of which (Scandinavian countries) only did it on first-time donors. Norway and Finland stopped it in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Two groups may be defined according to increasing prevalence rates per 10 000 donations in first-time donors: Scandinavia and Ireland (0 to 0.17), France, the Netherlands and UK (0.45 to 0.48); Romania was clearly apart from all other participating countries (5.33). HTLV-positive donors (88.6%) either come from endemic areas (82.3%) or declare to have a sexual partner coming from endemic areas (6.3%). Of the 283 HTLV-positive donations that could be characterized, 6.6% were HTLV-II. Fourteen of 22 countries currently use systematic leucoreduction, at least in cellular blood components. Six countries perform both universal anti-HTLV screening and blood cell leucoreduction.

CONCLUSION

The implementation of leucoreduction did not modify the blood HTLVscreening policy, except for Norway and Finland. Several screening strategies in low endemic countries performing leucoreduction were discussed. However, the withdrawal of anti-HTLV screening should be decided after assessing the remaining HTLV transfusion risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Reference National Centre for hepatitis B et C and HIV in transfusion, Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine, Paris, France. slaperche@ints.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19076337

Citation

Laperche, S, et al. "Blood Safety Strategies for Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in Europe." Vox Sanguinis, vol. 96, no. 2, 2009, pp. 104-10.
Laperche S, Worms B, Pillonel J, et al. Blood safety strategies for human T-cell lymphotropic virus in Europe. Vox Sang. 2009;96(2):104-10.
Laperche, S., Worms, B., & Pillonel, J. (2009). Blood safety strategies for human T-cell lymphotropic virus in Europe. Vox Sanguinis, 96(2), 104-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1423-0410.2008.01136.x
Laperche S, et al. Blood Safety Strategies for Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in Europe. Vox Sang. 2009;96(2):104-10. PubMed PMID: 19076337.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood safety strategies for human T-cell lymphotropic virus in Europe. AU - Laperche,S, AU - Worms,B, AU - Pillonel,J, AU - ,, AU - ,, PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/3/24/medline SP - 104 EP - 10 JF - Vox sanguinis JO - Vox Sang VL - 96 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: To prevent the blood transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), different countries have introduced anti-HTLV blood screening. Furthermore, leucoreduction of blood components has been implemented to preclude the transmission of infectious agents present in white blood cells. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: To evaluate the current European strategies adopted to ensure the blood safety for HTLV, a European investigation spanning a period from 2003 to 2008 was carried out. RESULTS: In 2003, of the 23 included countries, 11 performed anti-HTLV screening, four of which (Scandinavian countries) only did it on first-time donors. Norway and Finland stopped it in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Two groups may be defined according to increasing prevalence rates per 10 000 donations in first-time donors: Scandinavia and Ireland (0 to 0.17), France, the Netherlands and UK (0.45 to 0.48); Romania was clearly apart from all other participating countries (5.33). HTLV-positive donors (88.6%) either come from endemic areas (82.3%) or declare to have a sexual partner coming from endemic areas (6.3%). Of the 283 HTLV-positive donations that could be characterized, 6.6% were HTLV-II. Fourteen of 22 countries currently use systematic leucoreduction, at least in cellular blood components. Six countries perform both universal anti-HTLV screening and blood cell leucoreduction. CONCLUSION: The implementation of leucoreduction did not modify the blood HTLVscreening policy, except for Norway and Finland. Several screening strategies in low endemic countries performing leucoreduction were discussed. However, the withdrawal of anti-HTLV screening should be decided after assessing the remaining HTLV transfusion risk. SN - 1423-0410 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19076337/Blood_safety_strategies_for_human_T_cell_lymphotropic_virus_in_Europe_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1423-0410.2008.01136.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -