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Early exposure and sensitization to cat and dog: different effects on asthma risk after wheezing in infancy.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008 Dec; 19(8):696-701.PA

Abstract

Birth cohort studies have suggested that early exposure to furred pets protects from later asthma and allergy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between exposure or sensitization to cat or dog in infancy, and later asthma and allergy assessed at the median ages of 4.0, 7.2 and 12.3 yr, in children who have wheezed at <24 months of age. Exposure to cat and dog in infancy was assessed by interviewing the parents. The child was considered as sensitized, if the allergen-specific IgE to cat or to dog was >or=0.35 kU/l, or if there was a positive skin test response. When the 20 children with persistent childhood asthma (doctor-diagnosed asthma at all three control visits) were compared with the other 61 children, an early exposure to dog (OR = 0.14, p = 0.034)) decreased the asthma risk and an early sensitization to cat (OR = 5.92, p = 0.008) and dog (OR = 9.33, p = 0.001) increased the asthma risk. There were less cat and dog keeping in atopic families and the effect of sensitization was, but the effect of exposure was not, robust to adjustments in multivariate analyses. The present study demonstrates, in a long-term follow-up after early wheezing, that early sensitization to cat and dog increases the risk of later asthma but early exposure to cat or dog has no such effect. Dog keeping was less frequent in atopic families, which may explain that the protective effect of early exposure to dog was lost in multivariate analyses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Research Center, Tampere University and University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. matti.korppi@uta.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19076565

Citation

Korppi, Matti, et al. "Early Exposure and Sensitization to Cat and Dog: Different Effects On Asthma Risk After Wheezing in Infancy." Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, vol. 19, no. 8, 2008, pp. 696-701.
Korppi M, Hyvärinen M, Kotaniemi-Syrjänen A, et al. Early exposure and sensitization to cat and dog: different effects on asthma risk after wheezing in infancy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008;19(8):696-701.
Korppi, M., Hyvärinen, M., Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, A., Piippo-Savolainen, E., & Reijonen, T. (2008). Early exposure and sensitization to cat and dog: different effects on asthma risk after wheezing in infancy. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 19(8), 696-701. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2008.00758.x
Korppi M, et al. Early Exposure and Sensitization to Cat and Dog: Different Effects On Asthma Risk After Wheezing in Infancy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008;19(8):696-701. PubMed PMID: 19076565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early exposure and sensitization to cat and dog: different effects on asthma risk after wheezing in infancy. AU - Korppi,Matti, AU - Hyvärinen,Mari, AU - Kotaniemi-Syrjänen,Anne, AU - Piippo-Savolainen,Eija, AU - Reijonen,Tiina, PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/5/16/medline SP - 696 EP - 701 JF - Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology JO - Pediatr Allergy Immunol VL - 19 IS - 8 N2 - Birth cohort studies have suggested that early exposure to furred pets protects from later asthma and allergy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between exposure or sensitization to cat or dog in infancy, and later asthma and allergy assessed at the median ages of 4.0, 7.2 and 12.3 yr, in children who have wheezed at <24 months of age. Exposure to cat and dog in infancy was assessed by interviewing the parents. The child was considered as sensitized, if the allergen-specific IgE to cat or to dog was >or=0.35 kU/l, or if there was a positive skin test response. When the 20 children with persistent childhood asthma (doctor-diagnosed asthma at all three control visits) were compared with the other 61 children, an early exposure to dog (OR = 0.14, p = 0.034)) decreased the asthma risk and an early sensitization to cat (OR = 5.92, p = 0.008) and dog (OR = 9.33, p = 0.001) increased the asthma risk. There were less cat and dog keeping in atopic families and the effect of sensitization was, but the effect of exposure was not, robust to adjustments in multivariate analyses. The present study demonstrates, in a long-term follow-up after early wheezing, that early sensitization to cat and dog increases the risk of later asthma but early exposure to cat or dog has no such effect. Dog keeping was less frequent in atopic families, which may explain that the protective effect of early exposure to dog was lost in multivariate analyses. SN - 1399-3038 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19076565/Early_exposure_and_sensitization_to_cat_and_dog:_different_effects_on_asthma_risk_after_wheezing_in_infancy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2008.00758.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -