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Antioxidant vitamins reduce acute meal-induced memory deficits in adults with type 2 diabetes.
Nutr Res. 2008 Jul; 28(7):423-9.NR

Abstract

Memory impairment is observed in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with further acute deficits after meal ingestion. This study explored whether postprandial oxidative stress was a contributor to these meal-induced memory deficits. Sixteen adults with T2DM (mean age, 63.5 +/- 2.1 years) who were not regularly taking high-dose antioxidant supplements were fed a high-fat meal, the same test meal with vitamins C (1000 mg) and E (800 IU) tablets, or water on 3 separate occasions. After meal ingestion, a battery of cognitive tests were administered, which included measures of delayed verbal memory, assessed at 60 and 105 minutes after meal ingestion. Relative to water consumption, the high-fat meal resulted in poorer performance at 105 minutes postingestion on measures of delayed verbal recall (word list and paragraph recall) and working memory (Digit-Span Forward). Coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins and high-fat meal prevented this meal-induced deficit such that performance on these tasks was indistinguishable from that after water intake. At the same time point, a small but significant improvement on the word-naming and color-naming components of Stroop was observed after meal ingestion, relative to water, irrespective of whether antioxidants were consumed, demonstrating the specificity of meal-induced impairments to memory function. Executive function, assessed by Trails Parts A and B, was not influenced by meal or antioxidant ingestion. In adults with T2DM, coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins minimizes meal-induced memory impairment, implicating oxidative stress as a potential contributor to these decrements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19083441

Citation

Chui, Michael Herman, and Carol E. Greenwood. "Antioxidant Vitamins Reduce Acute Meal-induced Memory Deficits in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 28, no. 7, 2008, pp. 423-9.
Chui MH, Greenwood CE. Antioxidant vitamins reduce acute meal-induced memory deficits in adults with type 2 diabetes. Nutr Res. 2008;28(7):423-9.
Chui, M. H., & Greenwood, C. E. (2008). Antioxidant vitamins reduce acute meal-induced memory deficits in adults with type 2 diabetes. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 28(7), 423-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2008.03.016
Chui MH, Greenwood CE. Antioxidant Vitamins Reduce Acute Meal-induced Memory Deficits in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes. Nutr Res. 2008;28(7):423-9. PubMed PMID: 19083441.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidant vitamins reduce acute meal-induced memory deficits in adults with type 2 diabetes. AU - Chui,Michael Herman, AU - Greenwood,Carol E, PY - 2007/08/01/received PY - 2008/03/16/revised PY - 2008/03/21/accepted PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/3/7/medline SP - 423 EP - 9 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - Memory impairment is observed in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with further acute deficits after meal ingestion. This study explored whether postprandial oxidative stress was a contributor to these meal-induced memory deficits. Sixteen adults with T2DM (mean age, 63.5 +/- 2.1 years) who were not regularly taking high-dose antioxidant supplements were fed a high-fat meal, the same test meal with vitamins C (1000 mg) and E (800 IU) tablets, or water on 3 separate occasions. After meal ingestion, a battery of cognitive tests were administered, which included measures of delayed verbal memory, assessed at 60 and 105 minutes after meal ingestion. Relative to water consumption, the high-fat meal resulted in poorer performance at 105 minutes postingestion on measures of delayed verbal recall (word list and paragraph recall) and working memory (Digit-Span Forward). Coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins and high-fat meal prevented this meal-induced deficit such that performance on these tasks was indistinguishable from that after water intake. At the same time point, a small but significant improvement on the word-naming and color-naming components of Stroop was observed after meal ingestion, relative to water, irrespective of whether antioxidants were consumed, demonstrating the specificity of meal-induced impairments to memory function. Executive function, assessed by Trails Parts A and B, was not influenced by meal or antioxidant ingestion. In adults with T2DM, coconsumption of antioxidant vitamins minimizes meal-induced memory impairment, implicating oxidative stress as a potential contributor to these decrements. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19083441/Antioxidant_vitamins_reduce_acute_meal_induced_memory_deficits_in_adults_with_type_2_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(08)00090-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -