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Vitamin K supplementation does not significantly impact bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women.
Nutr Res 2008; 28(9):577-82NR

Abstract

Because of its role in osteoblastic metabolism, vitamin K has been studied with respect to bone. However, there has been limited research examining the influence of long-term vitamin K supplementation on bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the impact of 6 months of vitamin K supplementation on BMD and biomarkers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that vitamin K would improve BMD and biochemical markers of bone formation. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial is an effective way to study the impact of long-term supplementation. Thus, 14 pre- and perimenopausal women, 25 to 50 years of age, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (E) that received 600 microg/d of vitamin K in the form of phylloquinone (K(1)) or a control group (C) that received identical-looking placebo tablets. Regional BMD and percent body fat, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and serum osteocalcin and urinary N-telopeptide levels were all assessed at 0, 3, and 6 months. When BMD was measured across time, C had a significant increase (P = .011) in greater trochanter BMD compared to E. The E group had a nonsignificant increase (P = .067) in shaft BMD compared to the C group. There was no significant difference between E and C in serum osteocalcin concentrations over time. Urinary N-telopeptide levels increased significantly over time in E compared to C (P = .008). Six months of 600 microg/d vitamin K(1) supplementation did not improve regional BMD in this group of pre- and perimenopausal women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Biobehavioral and Health Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6096, USA. svolpe@nursing.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19083462

Citation

Volpe, Stella L., et al. "Vitamin K Supplementation Does Not Significantly Impact Bone Mineral Density and Biochemical Markers of Bone in Pre- and Perimenopausal Women." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 28, no. 9, 2008, pp. 577-82.
Volpe SL, Leung MM, Giordano H. Vitamin K supplementation does not significantly impact bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women. Nutr Res. 2008;28(9):577-82.
Volpe, S. L., Leung, M. M., & Giordano, H. (2008). Vitamin K supplementation does not significantly impact bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 28(9), pp. 577-82. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2008.06.006.
Volpe SL, Leung MM, Giordano H. Vitamin K Supplementation Does Not Significantly Impact Bone Mineral Density and Biochemical Markers of Bone in Pre- and Perimenopausal Women. Nutr Res. 2008;28(9):577-82. PubMed PMID: 19083462.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin K supplementation does not significantly impact bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women. AU - Volpe,Stella L, AU - Leung,May May, AU - Giordano,Heather, PY - 2008/05/02/received PY - 2008/06/07/revised PY - 2008/06/12/accepted PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/3/10/medline SP - 577 EP - 82 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 28 IS - 9 N2 - Because of its role in osteoblastic metabolism, vitamin K has been studied with respect to bone. However, there has been limited research examining the influence of long-term vitamin K supplementation on bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the impact of 6 months of vitamin K supplementation on BMD and biomarkers of bone in pre- and perimenopausal women. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that vitamin K would improve BMD and biochemical markers of bone formation. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial is an effective way to study the impact of long-term supplementation. Thus, 14 pre- and perimenopausal women, 25 to 50 years of age, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (E) that received 600 microg/d of vitamin K in the form of phylloquinone (K(1)) or a control group (C) that received identical-looking placebo tablets. Regional BMD and percent body fat, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and serum osteocalcin and urinary N-telopeptide levels were all assessed at 0, 3, and 6 months. When BMD was measured across time, C had a significant increase (P = .011) in greater trochanter BMD compared to E. The E group had a nonsignificant increase (P = .067) in shaft BMD compared to the C group. There was no significant difference between E and C in serum osteocalcin concentrations over time. Urinary N-telopeptide levels increased significantly over time in E compared to C (P = .008). Six months of 600 microg/d vitamin K(1) supplementation did not improve regional BMD in this group of pre- and perimenopausal women. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19083462/Vitamin_K_supplementation_does_not_significantly_impact_bone_mineral_density_and_biochemical_markers_of_bone_in_pre__and_perimenopausal_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(08)00154-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -