Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Alternate-day fasting reduces global cell proliferation rates independently of dietary fat content in mice.
Nutrition. 2009 Apr; 25(4):486-91.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Cell proliferation rates represent a central element in the promotional phase of carcinogenesis. Modified alternate-day fasting (ADF), i.e., a partial 24-h fast alternated with 24-h ad libitum feeding, reduces global cell proliferation rates on a low-fat (LF) diet. Because the majority of Americans consume a diet that is high in fat, testing the antiproliferative ability of ADF on a high-fat (HF) diet is important in terms of diet tolerability in humans. Accordingly, we examined the effects of 85% restriction on the fast day (ADF-85%) with an LF or HF background diet on proliferation rates of various tissues.

METHODS

In a 4-wk study, male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to one of three groups: 1) ADF-85%-LF, 2) ADF-85%-HF, or 3) control.

RESULTS

Body weights of the ADF mice were similar to that of controls throughout the study. A hyperphagic response (P < 0.001) was noted only in the ADF-85%-LF group (approximately 55% more food consumed on the feed day than controls). No differences were noted for mean energy intake between ADF groups on feed or fast days. Equivalent reductions (P < 0.01) in epidermal, prostate, liver, and splenic T-cell proliferation rates were observed in both ADF groups versus controls. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 levels decreased (P < 0.05) similarly in both ADF groups. Insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA levels were not affected by either treatment.

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate that ADF has an antiproliferative effect over a wide range of fat intakes, which may enhance adherence to ADF in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA. kvarady@nature.berkeley.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19084375

Citation

Varady, Krista A., et al. "Alternate-day Fasting Reduces Global Cell Proliferation Rates Independently of Dietary Fat Content in Mice." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 25, no. 4, 2009, pp. 486-91.
Varady KA, Roohk DJ, Bruss M, et al. Alternate-day fasting reduces global cell proliferation rates independently of dietary fat content in mice. Nutrition. 2009;25(4):486-91.
Varady, K. A., Roohk, D. J., Bruss, M., & Hellerstein, M. K. (2009). Alternate-day fasting reduces global cell proliferation rates independently of dietary fat content in mice. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 25(4), 486-91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2008.10.017
Varady KA, et al. Alternate-day Fasting Reduces Global Cell Proliferation Rates Independently of Dietary Fat Content in Mice. Nutrition. 2009;25(4):486-91. PubMed PMID: 19084375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alternate-day fasting reduces global cell proliferation rates independently of dietary fat content in mice. AU - Varady,Krista A, AU - Roohk,Donald J, AU - Bruss,Mathew, AU - Hellerstein,Marc K, Y1 - 2008/12/11/ PY - 2008/07/27/received PY - 2008/09/30/revised PY - 2008/10/15/accepted PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/5/27/medline SP - 486 EP - 91 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Cell proliferation rates represent a central element in the promotional phase of carcinogenesis. Modified alternate-day fasting (ADF), i.e., a partial 24-h fast alternated with 24-h ad libitum feeding, reduces global cell proliferation rates on a low-fat (LF) diet. Because the majority of Americans consume a diet that is high in fat, testing the antiproliferative ability of ADF on a high-fat (HF) diet is important in terms of diet tolerability in humans. Accordingly, we examined the effects of 85% restriction on the fast day (ADF-85%) with an LF or HF background diet on proliferation rates of various tissues. METHODS: In a 4-wk study, male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to one of three groups: 1) ADF-85%-LF, 2) ADF-85%-HF, or 3) control. RESULTS: Body weights of the ADF mice were similar to that of controls throughout the study. A hyperphagic response (P < 0.001) was noted only in the ADF-85%-LF group (approximately 55% more food consumed on the feed day than controls). No differences were noted for mean energy intake between ADF groups on feed or fast days. Equivalent reductions (P < 0.01) in epidermal, prostate, liver, and splenic T-cell proliferation rates were observed in both ADF groups versus controls. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 levels decreased (P < 0.05) similarly in both ADF groups. Insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA levels were not affected by either treatment. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that ADF has an antiproliferative effect over a wide range of fat intakes, which may enhance adherence to ADF in humans. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19084375/Alternate_day_fasting_reduces_global_cell_proliferation_rates_independently_of_dietary_fat_content_in_mice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(08)00443-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -