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Food allergy is associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma.
J Asthma 2008; 45(10):862-6JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Risk factors for potentially fatal childhood asthma are incompletely understood.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether self-reported food allergy is significantly associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma.

STUDY DESIGN

Medical records from 72 patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for asthmatic exacerbation were reviewed and compared in a case-control design with 2 randomly selected groups of 108 patients admitted to a regular nursing floor for asthma and 108 ambulatory patients with asthma. Factors evaluated included self-reported food allergy, gender, age, poverty area residence, race/ethnicity, inhaled steroid exposure, tobacco exposure, length of hospital stay, psychologic comorbidity, and season of admission.

RESULTS

At least one food allergy was documented for 13% (38/288) of the patients. Egg, peanut, fish/shellfish, milk, and tree nut accounted for 78.6% of all food allergies. Children admitted to the PICU were significantly more likely to report food allergy (p = 0.004) and 3.3 times more likely to report at least one food allergy compared with children admitted to a regular nursing floor, and significantly more likely to report food allergy (p < 0.001) and 7.4 times more likely to report at least one food allergy compared with children seen in the ambulatory setting. Children admitted to either the PICU or the regular nursing floor were significantly more likely be African-American (p < 0.001) and to be younger (p < 0.01) compared with children seen in the ambulatory setting.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-reported food allergy is an independent risk factor for potentially fatal childhood asthma. Asthmatic children or adolescents with food allergy are a target population for more aggressive asthma management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Children's Hospital, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Center for Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. nicolavogel@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19085574

Citation

Vogel, Nicola M., et al. "Food Allergy Is Associated With Potentially Fatal Childhood Asthma." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, vol. 45, no. 10, 2008, pp. 862-6.
Vogel NM, Katz HT, Lopez R, et al. Food allergy is associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma. J Asthma. 2008;45(10):862-6.
Vogel, N. M., Katz, H. T., Lopez, R., & Lang, D. M. (2008). Food allergy is associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 45(10), pp. 862-6. doi:10.1080/02770900802444195.
Vogel NM, et al. Food Allergy Is Associated With Potentially Fatal Childhood Asthma. J Asthma. 2008;45(10):862-6. PubMed PMID: 19085574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food allergy is associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma. AU - Vogel,Nicola M, AU - Katz,Hary T, AU - Lopez,Rocio, AU - Lang,David M, PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/1/23/medline SP - 862 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma VL - 45 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Risk factors for potentially fatal childhood asthma are incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether self-reported food allergy is significantly associated with potentially fatal childhood asthma. STUDY DESIGN: Medical records from 72 patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for asthmatic exacerbation were reviewed and compared in a case-control design with 2 randomly selected groups of 108 patients admitted to a regular nursing floor for asthma and 108 ambulatory patients with asthma. Factors evaluated included self-reported food allergy, gender, age, poverty area residence, race/ethnicity, inhaled steroid exposure, tobacco exposure, length of hospital stay, psychologic comorbidity, and season of admission. RESULTS: At least one food allergy was documented for 13% (38/288) of the patients. Egg, peanut, fish/shellfish, milk, and tree nut accounted for 78.6% of all food allergies. Children admitted to the PICU were significantly more likely to report food allergy (p = 0.004) and 3.3 times more likely to report at least one food allergy compared with children admitted to a regular nursing floor, and significantly more likely to report food allergy (p < 0.001) and 7.4 times more likely to report at least one food allergy compared with children seen in the ambulatory setting. Children admitted to either the PICU or the regular nursing floor were significantly more likely be African-American (p < 0.001) and to be younger (p < 0.01) compared with children seen in the ambulatory setting. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported food allergy is an independent risk factor for potentially fatal childhood asthma. Asthmatic children or adolescents with food allergy are a target population for more aggressive asthma management. SN - 1532-4303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19085574/Food_allergy_is_associated_with_potentially_fatal_childhood_asthma_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770900802444195 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -