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Safety and driving ability following low-dose propofol sedation.
Digestion. 2008; 78(4):190-4.D

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Automobile driving is prohibited after midazolam sedation because of the slow recovery of psychomotor function. This study prospectively assessed the safety of low-dose propofol sedation (study 1) and compared driving ability following propofol and midazolam sedation (study 2).

METHODS

Study 1: We prospectively investigated bolus injection of a low-dose of propofol (40-80 mg for <70 years and 30 mg for >or=70 years) for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Respiratory depression, time to full recovery, and overall patient satisfaction were evaluated and blood concentrations of propofol were measured. Study 2: A subset of subjects undergoing diagnostic EGD were randomized to receive 40 mg of propofol (n = 30), 4 mg of midazolam (n = 30) or no sedation controls (n = 20), and the residual effects of each drug were tested using a driving simulator. The primary outcome measure was driving ability. The second outcome measures were overall patient satisfaction and complications.

RESULTS

Study 1: Only 1.1% of 12,031 healthy subjects developed transient oxygen desaturation. Full recovery was present in 97.5% 30 min after the procedure; 99.8% were willing to repeat the same procedure. The blood levels of propofol (40-80 mg) at 60 min were <100 ng/ml. Study 2: Driving ability recovered to the basal level within 60 min of propofol administration but not with 120 min with midazolam. There were no complications; overall patient satisfaction was similar between propofol and midazolam (8.9 vs. 8.5, p = 0.34).

CONCLUSION

Low-dose propofol sedation was safe and recovery including driving ability was with 60 min.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Showa Inan General Hospital, Komagane, Japan. horiuchi.akira@sihp.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19092246

Citation

Horiuchi, Akira, et al. "Safety and Driving Ability Following Low-dose Propofol Sedation." Digestion, vol. 78, no. 4, 2008, pp. 190-4.
Horiuchi A, Nakayama Y, Katsuyama Y, et al. Safety and driving ability following low-dose propofol sedation. Digestion. 2008;78(4):190-4.
Horiuchi, A., Nakayama, Y., Katsuyama, Y., Ohmori, S., Ichise, Y., & Tanaka, N. (2008). Safety and driving ability following low-dose propofol sedation. Digestion, 78(4), 190-4. https://doi.org/10.1159/000187118
Horiuchi A, et al. Safety and Driving Ability Following Low-dose Propofol Sedation. Digestion. 2008;78(4):190-4. PubMed PMID: 19092246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Safety and driving ability following low-dose propofol sedation. AU - Horiuchi,Akira, AU - Nakayama,Yoshiko, AU - Katsuyama,Yoshihiko, AU - Ohmori,Shigeru, AU - Ichise,Yasuyuki, AU - Tanaka,Naoki, Y1 - 2008/12/18/ PY - 2008/09/15/received PY - 2008/10/27/accepted PY - 2008/12/19/entrez PY - 2008/12/19/pubmed PY - 2009/4/10/medline SP - 190 EP - 4 JF - Digestion JO - Digestion VL - 78 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Automobile driving is prohibited after midazolam sedation because of the slow recovery of psychomotor function. This study prospectively assessed the safety of low-dose propofol sedation (study 1) and compared driving ability following propofol and midazolam sedation (study 2). METHODS: Study 1: We prospectively investigated bolus injection of a low-dose of propofol (40-80 mg for <70 years and 30 mg for >or=70 years) for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Respiratory depression, time to full recovery, and overall patient satisfaction were evaluated and blood concentrations of propofol were measured. Study 2: A subset of subjects undergoing diagnostic EGD were randomized to receive 40 mg of propofol (n = 30), 4 mg of midazolam (n = 30) or no sedation controls (n = 20), and the residual effects of each drug were tested using a driving simulator. The primary outcome measure was driving ability. The second outcome measures were overall patient satisfaction and complications. RESULTS: Study 1: Only 1.1% of 12,031 healthy subjects developed transient oxygen desaturation. Full recovery was present in 97.5% 30 min after the procedure; 99.8% were willing to repeat the same procedure. The blood levels of propofol (40-80 mg) at 60 min were <100 ng/ml. Study 2: Driving ability recovered to the basal level within 60 min of propofol administration but not with 120 min with midazolam. There were no complications; overall patient satisfaction was similar between propofol and midazolam (8.9 vs. 8.5, p = 0.34). CONCLUSION: Low-dose propofol sedation was safe and recovery including driving ability was with 60 min. SN - 1421-9867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19092246/Safety_and_driving_ability_following_low_dose_propofol_sedation_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000187118 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -