Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Resistance exercise increases postprandial muscle protein synthesis in humans.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jan; 41(1):144-54.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

We examined the impact of an acute bout of resistance-type exercise on mixed muscle protein synthesis in the fed state.

METHODS

After a standardized breakfast, 10 untrained males completed a single, unilateral lower-limb resistance-type exercise session. A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-C6]phenylalanine was combined with muscle biopsy collection from both the exercised (Ex) and the nonexercised (NEx) leg to assess the impact of local muscle contractions on muscle protein synthesis rates after food intake. Western blotting with phosphospecific and pan antibodies was used to determine the phosphorylation status of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), 4E-binding protein (4E-BP1), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1).

RESULTS

Muscle protein synthesis rates were approximately 20% higher in Ex compared with NEx (0.098% +/- 0.005% vs 0.083% +/- 0.002%.h, respectively, P < 0.01). In the fed state, resistance-type exercise did not elevate AMPK phosphorylation. However, the phosphorylation status of 4E-BP1 was approximately 20% lower after cessation of exercise in Ex compared with NEx (P < 0.05). Conversely, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation was significantly higher in Ex compared with NEx after 6 h of recovery (P < 0.05) with no changes in mTOR phosphorylation. S6 phosphorylation was greater in Ex versus NEx after cessation of exercise (P < 0.05), although S6K1 phosphorylation at T was not up-regulated (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION

We conclude that resistance-type exercise performed in a fed state further elevates postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates, which is accompanied by an increase in S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UNITED KINGDOM.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19092695

Citation

Witard, Oliver C., et al. "Resistance Exercise Increases Postprandial Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 41, no. 1, 2009, pp. 144-54.
Witard OC, Tieland M, Beelen M, et al. Resistance exercise increases postprandial muscle protein synthesis in humans. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(1):144-54.
Witard, O. C., Tieland, M., Beelen, M., Tipton, K. D., van Loon, L. J., & Koopman, R. (2009). Resistance exercise increases postprandial muscle protein synthesis in humans. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 41(1), 144-54. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181844e79
Witard OC, et al. Resistance Exercise Increases Postprandial Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(1):144-54. PubMed PMID: 19092695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resistance exercise increases postprandial muscle protein synthesis in humans. AU - Witard,Oliver C, AU - Tieland,Michael, AU - Beelen,Milou, AU - Tipton,Kevin D, AU - van Loon,Luc J C, AU - Koopman,René, PY - 2008/12/19/entrez PY - 2008/12/19/pubmed PY - 2009/5/14/medline SP - 144 EP - 54 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 41 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: We examined the impact of an acute bout of resistance-type exercise on mixed muscle protein synthesis in the fed state. METHODS: After a standardized breakfast, 10 untrained males completed a single, unilateral lower-limb resistance-type exercise session. A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-C6]phenylalanine was combined with muscle biopsy collection from both the exercised (Ex) and the nonexercised (NEx) leg to assess the impact of local muscle contractions on muscle protein synthesis rates after food intake. Western blotting with phosphospecific and pan antibodies was used to determine the phosphorylation status of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), 4E-binding protein (4E-BP1), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1). RESULTS: Muscle protein synthesis rates were approximately 20% higher in Ex compared with NEx (0.098% +/- 0.005% vs 0.083% +/- 0.002%.h, respectively, P < 0.01). In the fed state, resistance-type exercise did not elevate AMPK phosphorylation. However, the phosphorylation status of 4E-BP1 was approximately 20% lower after cessation of exercise in Ex compared with NEx (P < 0.05). Conversely, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation was significantly higher in Ex compared with NEx after 6 h of recovery (P < 0.05) with no changes in mTOR phosphorylation. S6 phosphorylation was greater in Ex versus NEx after cessation of exercise (P < 0.05), although S6K1 phosphorylation at T was not up-regulated (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: We conclude that resistance-type exercise performed in a fed state further elevates postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates, which is accompanied by an increase in S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19092695/Resistance_exercise_increases_postprandial_muscle_protein_synthesis_in_humans_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181844e79 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -