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Overweight and obesity in old age are not associated with greater dementia risk.
J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56(12):2261-6JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe the association between body mass index (BMI) and dementia risk in older persons.

DESIGN

Prospective population-based study, with 8 years of follow-up.

SETTING

The municipality of Lieto, Finland, 1990/91 and 1998/99.

PARTICIPANTS

Six hundred five men and women without dementia aged 65 to 92 at baseline (mean age 70.8).

MEASUREMENTS

Weight and height were measured at baseline and at the 8-year follow-up. Dementia was clinically assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria.

RESULTS

Eighty-six persons were diagnosed with dementia. Cox regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, education, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and alcohol use, indicated that, for each unit increase in BMI score, the risk of dementia decreased 8% (hazard ratio (HR)=0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-0.97). This association remained significant when individuals who developed dementia early during the first 4 years of follow-up were excluded from the analyses (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.86-0.99). Women with high BMI scores had a lower dementia risk (HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.84-0.96). Men with high BMI scores also tended to have a lower dementia risk, although the association did not reach significance (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.84-1.07).

CONCLUSION

Older persons with higher BMI scores have less dementia risk than their counterparts with lower BMI scores. High BMI scores in late life should not necessarily be considered to be a risk factor for dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. anna.dahl@hhj.hj.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19093925

Citation

Dahl, Anna K., et al. "Overweight and Obesity in Old Age Are Not Associated With Greater Dementia Risk." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 56, no. 12, 2008, pp. 2261-6.
Dahl AK, Löppönen M, Isoaho R, et al. Overweight and obesity in old age are not associated with greater dementia risk. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(12):2261-6.
Dahl, A. K., Löppönen, M., Isoaho, R., Berg, S., & Kivelä, S. L. (2008). Overweight and obesity in old age are not associated with greater dementia risk. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56(12), pp. 2261-6. doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01958.x.
Dahl AK, et al. Overweight and Obesity in Old Age Are Not Associated With Greater Dementia Risk. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(12):2261-6. PubMed PMID: 19093925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overweight and obesity in old age are not associated with greater dementia risk. AU - Dahl,Anna K, AU - Löppönen,Minna, AU - Isoaho,Raimo, AU - Berg,Stig, AU - Kivelä,Sirkka-Liisa, PY - 2008/12/20/entrez PY - 2008/12/20/pubmed PY - 2009/1/23/medline SP - 2261 EP - 6 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 56 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the association between body mass index (BMI) and dementia risk in older persons. DESIGN: Prospective population-based study, with 8 years of follow-up. SETTING: The municipality of Lieto, Finland, 1990/91 and 1998/99. PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred five men and women without dementia aged 65 to 92 at baseline (mean age 70.8). MEASUREMENTS: Weight and height were measured at baseline and at the 8-year follow-up. Dementia was clinically assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. RESULTS: Eighty-six persons were diagnosed with dementia. Cox regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, education, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and alcohol use, indicated that, for each unit increase in BMI score, the risk of dementia decreased 8% (hazard ratio (HR)=0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-0.97). This association remained significant when individuals who developed dementia early during the first 4 years of follow-up were excluded from the analyses (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.86-0.99). Women with high BMI scores had a lower dementia risk (HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.84-0.96). Men with high BMI scores also tended to have a lower dementia risk, although the association did not reach significance (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.84-1.07). CONCLUSION: Older persons with higher BMI scores have less dementia risk than their counterparts with lower BMI scores. High BMI scores in late life should not necessarily be considered to be a risk factor for dementia. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19093925/Overweight_and_obesity_in_old_age_are_not_associated_with_greater_dementia_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01958.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -