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Emotional intelligence, not music training, predicts recognition of emotional speech prosody.
Emotion. 2008 Dec; 8(6):838-49.E

Abstract

Is music training associated with greater sensitivity to emotional prosody in speech? University undergraduates (n = 100) were asked to identify the emotion conveyed in both semantically neutral utterances and melodic analogues that preserved the fundamental frequency contour and intensity pattern of the utterances. Utterances were expressed in four basic emotional tones (anger, fear, joy, sadness) and in a neutral condition. Participants also completed an extended questionnaire about music education and activities, and a battery of tests to assess emotional intelligence, musical perception and memory, and fluid intelligence. Emotional intelligence, not music training or music perception abilities, successfully predicted identification of intended emotion in speech and melodic analogues. The ability to recognize cues of emotion accurately and efficiently across domains may reflect the operation of a cross-modal processor that does not rely on gains of perceptual sensitivity such as those related to music training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19102595

Citation

Trimmer, Christopher G., and Lola L. Cuddy. "Emotional Intelligence, Not Music Training, Predicts Recognition of Emotional Speech Prosody." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 8, no. 6, 2008, pp. 838-49.
Trimmer CG, Cuddy LL. Emotional intelligence, not music training, predicts recognition of emotional speech prosody. Emotion. 2008;8(6):838-49.
Trimmer, C. G., & Cuddy, L. L. (2008). Emotional intelligence, not music training, predicts recognition of emotional speech prosody. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 8(6), 838-49. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014080
Trimmer CG, Cuddy LL. Emotional Intelligence, Not Music Training, Predicts Recognition of Emotional Speech Prosody. Emotion. 2008;8(6):838-49. PubMed PMID: 19102595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotional intelligence, not music training, predicts recognition of emotional speech prosody. AU - Trimmer,Christopher G, AU - Cuddy,Lola L, PY - 2008/12/24/entrez PY - 2008/12/24/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline SP - 838 EP - 49 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - Is music training associated with greater sensitivity to emotional prosody in speech? University undergraduates (n = 100) were asked to identify the emotion conveyed in both semantically neutral utterances and melodic analogues that preserved the fundamental frequency contour and intensity pattern of the utterances. Utterances were expressed in four basic emotional tones (anger, fear, joy, sadness) and in a neutral condition. Participants also completed an extended questionnaire about music education and activities, and a battery of tests to assess emotional intelligence, musical perception and memory, and fluid intelligence. Emotional intelligence, not music training or music perception abilities, successfully predicted identification of intended emotion in speech and melodic analogues. The ability to recognize cues of emotion accurately and efficiently across domains may reflect the operation of a cross-modal processor that does not rely on gains of perceptual sensitivity such as those related to music training. SN - 1528-3542 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19102595/Emotional_intelligence_not_music_training_predicts_recognition_of_emotional_speech_prosody_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -