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Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural agricultural community.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jan; 109(1):45-51.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption has been documented in a limited number of previous investigations and is important for the design of epidemiologic investigations and in the evaluation of intervention programs.

OBJECTIVE

This study investigates fruit and vegetable consumption behaviors among Hispanic farmworkers and non-farmworkers in a rural agricultural community.

DESIGN

A larger study recruited 101 farmworker families and 100 non-farmworker families from the Yakima Valley in Washington State between December 2004 and October 2005. All families were Hispanic. An in-person administered questionnaire collected information on consumption of locally grown fruits and vegetables and sources of obtaining fruits and vegetables. Data on dietary intake asked whether or not the respondent had consumed a given fruit or vegetable in the past month. Data were collected longitudinally, coinciding with three agricultural seasons: thinning (summer), harvest (fall), and nonspray (winter).

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Generalized estimating equations were used to test for statistical significance between proportions of the population who consumed a given fruit or vegetable across agricultural seasons. Multivariable logistic regression was performed and corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are reported.

RESULTS

The proportion of respondents who ate apples, pears, plums, peaches, apricots, peppers, corn, and cucumbers was highest in the fall harvest season, whereas the proportions of those who ate cherries and asparagus were highest in the summer thinning season. Compared to non-farmworkers, a higher proportion of farmworkers reported having eaten peaches, apricots, cherries, green beans, carrots, peppers, corn, pumpkin, squash, and onions, in the past month.

CONCLUSIONS

Epidemiologic investigations and public health interventions that examine the consumption of fruits and vegetables should consider seasonal variation in consumption patterns, especially in agricultural communities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology, Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA. emily.locke@alaska.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19103322

Citation

Locke, Emily, et al. "Seasonal Variation in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Rural Agricultural Community." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 1, 2009, pp. 45-51.
Locke E, Coronado GD, Thompson B, et al. Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural agricultural community. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(1):45-51.
Locke, E., Coronado, G. D., Thompson, B., & Kuniyuki, A. (2009). Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural agricultural community. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(1), 45-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.007
Locke E, et al. Seasonal Variation in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Rural Agricultural Community. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(1):45-51. PubMed PMID: 19103322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural agricultural community. AU - Locke,Emily, AU - Coronado,Gloria D, AU - Thompson,Beti, AU - Kuniyuki,Alan, PY - 2007/09/27/received PY - 2008/06/13/accepted PY - 2008/12/24/entrez PY - 2008/12/24/pubmed PY - 2009/3/4/medline SP - 45 EP - 51 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Seasonal variation in fruit and vegetable consumption has been documented in a limited number of previous investigations and is important for the design of epidemiologic investigations and in the evaluation of intervention programs. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates fruit and vegetable consumption behaviors among Hispanic farmworkers and non-farmworkers in a rural agricultural community. DESIGN: A larger study recruited 101 farmworker families and 100 non-farmworker families from the Yakima Valley in Washington State between December 2004 and October 2005. All families were Hispanic. An in-person administered questionnaire collected information on consumption of locally grown fruits and vegetables and sources of obtaining fruits and vegetables. Data on dietary intake asked whether or not the respondent had consumed a given fruit or vegetable in the past month. Data were collected longitudinally, coinciding with three agricultural seasons: thinning (summer), harvest (fall), and nonspray (winter). STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Generalized estimating equations were used to test for statistical significance between proportions of the population who consumed a given fruit or vegetable across agricultural seasons. Multivariable logistic regression was performed and corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are reported. RESULTS: The proportion of respondents who ate apples, pears, plums, peaches, apricots, peppers, corn, and cucumbers was highest in the fall harvest season, whereas the proportions of those who ate cherries and asparagus were highest in the summer thinning season. Compared to non-farmworkers, a higher proportion of farmworkers reported having eaten peaches, apricots, cherries, green beans, carrots, peppers, corn, pumpkin, squash, and onions, in the past month. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiologic investigations and public health interventions that examine the consumption of fruits and vegetables should consider seasonal variation in consumption patterns, especially in agricultural communities. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19103322/Seasonal_variation_in_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_in_a_rural_agricultural_community_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(08)01884-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -