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The prevalence of hearing loss among schoolchildren with chronic suppurative otitis media in Nigeria, and its effect on academic performance.
Ear Nose Throat J. 2008 Dec; 87(12):E19.EN

Abstract

We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among 1,500 Nigerian schoolchildren aged 9 to 15 years who had chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). We also attempted to ascertain the effect that this hearing loss had on their academic performance. The study population was drawn from three schools in different socioeconomic tiers-low (n = 300), medium (n = 400), and high (n = 800). Overall, CSOM was present in 35 of these children (2.3%)-12 from the low-status school (4.0%), 11 from the middle-status school (2.8%), and 12 from the high-status school (1.5%); the overall difference in prevalence among the three schools was statistically significant (chi(2) = 6.40; degrees of freedom [df] = 2; p = 0.04). In all, 52 ears were affected by CSOM; of these, 18 (34.6%) had a pure-tone average (PTA) within normal limits, 20 (38.5%) had a mild conductive hearing loss, and 14 (26.9%) had a moderate loss. All but 2 of 160 control ears (1.2%) had hearing thresholds within normal limits. The difference in PTAs across groups was statistically significant (chi(2) = 114.89; df = 2; p< 0.001). As for academic performance, cumulative average test scores were significantly lower in the CSOM patients than in the controls-chi(2) = 14.57; df = 3; p = 0.002. At the higher end of the academic scale, scores of 66% and higher were obtained by 40.0% of patients and 51.3% of controls, and scores of 50 to 65% were achieved by 20.0% of patients and 37.5% of controls. At the lower end, scores of 40 to 49% were obtained by 31.4% of patients and 6.3% of controls, and scores of 39% and lower were obtained by 8.6% and 5.0%, respectively. We conclude that hearing loss was a significant sequela of CSOM in our study population and that it had an adverse effect on their academic performance. Children in the low socioeconomic group appeared to be more vulnerable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19105130

Citation

Olatoke, Fatai, et al. "The Prevalence of Hearing Loss Among Schoolchildren With Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media in Nigeria, and Its Effect On Academic Performance." Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal, vol. 87, no. 12, 2008, pp. E19.
Olatoke F, Ologe FE, Nwawolo CC, et al. The prevalence of hearing loss among schoolchildren with chronic suppurative otitis media in Nigeria, and its effect on academic performance. Ear Nose Throat J. 2008;87(12):E19.
Olatoke, F., Ologe, F. E., Nwawolo, C. C., & Saka, M. J. (2008). The prevalence of hearing loss among schoolchildren with chronic suppurative otitis media in Nigeria, and its effect on academic performance. Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal, 87(12), E19.
Olatoke F, et al. The Prevalence of Hearing Loss Among Schoolchildren With Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media in Nigeria, and Its Effect On Academic Performance. Ear Nose Throat J. 2008;87(12):E19. PubMed PMID: 19105130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence of hearing loss among schoolchildren with chronic suppurative otitis media in Nigeria, and its effect on academic performance. AU - Olatoke,Fatai, AU - Ologe,Foluwasayo Emmanuel, AU - Nwawolo,Clement C, AU - Saka,Mohammed Jimoh, PY - 2008/12/24/entrez PY - 2008/12/24/pubmed PY - 2009/5/9/medline SP - E19 EP - E19 JF - Ear, nose, & throat journal JO - Ear Nose Throat J VL - 87 IS - 12 N2 - We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among 1,500 Nigerian schoolchildren aged 9 to 15 years who had chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). We also attempted to ascertain the effect that this hearing loss had on their academic performance. The study population was drawn from three schools in different socioeconomic tiers-low (n = 300), medium (n = 400), and high (n = 800). Overall, CSOM was present in 35 of these children (2.3%)-12 from the low-status school (4.0%), 11 from the middle-status school (2.8%), and 12 from the high-status school (1.5%); the overall difference in prevalence among the three schools was statistically significant (chi(2) = 6.40; degrees of freedom [df] = 2; p = 0.04). In all, 52 ears were affected by CSOM; of these, 18 (34.6%) had a pure-tone average (PTA) within normal limits, 20 (38.5%) had a mild conductive hearing loss, and 14 (26.9%) had a moderate loss. All but 2 of 160 control ears (1.2%) had hearing thresholds within normal limits. The difference in PTAs across groups was statistically significant (chi(2) = 114.89; df = 2; p< 0.001). As for academic performance, cumulative average test scores were significantly lower in the CSOM patients than in the controls-chi(2) = 14.57; df = 3; p = 0.002. At the higher end of the academic scale, scores of 66% and higher were obtained by 40.0% of patients and 51.3% of controls, and scores of 50 to 65% were achieved by 20.0% of patients and 37.5% of controls. At the lower end, scores of 40 to 49% were obtained by 31.4% of patients and 6.3% of controls, and scores of 39% and lower were obtained by 8.6% and 5.0%, respectively. We conclude that hearing loss was a significant sequela of CSOM in our study population and that it had an adverse effect on their academic performance. Children in the low socioeconomic group appeared to be more vulnerable. SN - 1942-7522 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19105130/The_prevalence_of_hearing_loss_among_schoolchildren_with_chronic_suppurative_otitis_media_in_Nigeria_and_its_effect_on_academic_performance_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -