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Interaction of molasses and monensin in alfalfa hay- or corn silage-based diets on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and milk production by Holstein cows.
J Dairy Sci. 2009 Jan; 92(1):270-85.JD

Abstract

Sugar supplementation can stimulate rumen microbial growth and possibly fiber digestibility; however, excess ruminal carbohydrate availability relative to rumen-degradable protein (RDP) can promote energy spilling by microbes, decrease rumen pH, or depress fiber digestibility. Both RDP supply and rumen pH might be altered by forage source and monensin. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate interactions of a sugar source (molasses) with monensin and 2 forage sources on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and production and fatty acid composition of milk. Seven ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows were used in a 5 x 7 incomplete Latin square design with five 28-d periods. Four corn silage diets consisted of 1) control (C), 2) 2.6% molasses (M), 3) 2.6% molasses plus 0.45% urea (MU), or 4) 2.6% molasses plus 0.45% urea plus monensin sodium (Rumensin, at the intermediate dosage from the label, 16 g/909 kg of dry matter; MUR). Three chopped alfalfa hay diets consisted of 1) control (C), 2) 2.6% molasses (M), or 3) 2.6% molasses plus Rumensin (MR). Urea was added to corn silage diets to provide RDP comparable to alfalfa hay diets with no urea. Corn silage C and M diets were balanced to have 16.2% crude protein; and the remaining diets, 17.2% crude protein. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatment, but there was a trend for lower milk production in alfalfa hay diets compared with corn silage diets. Despite increased total volatile fatty acid and acetate concentrations in the rumen, total tract organic matter digestibility was lower for alfalfa hay-fed cows. Rumensin did not affect volatile fatty acid concentrations but decreased milk fat from 3.22 to 2.72% in corn silage diets but less in alfalfa hay diets. Medium-chain milk fatty acids (% of total fat) were lower for alfalfa hay compared with corn silage diets, and short-chain milk fatty acids tended to decrease when Rumensin was added. In whole rumen contents, concentrations of trans-10, cis-12 C(18:2) were increased when cows were fed corn silage diets. Rumensin had no effect on conjugated linoleic acid isomers in either milk or rumen contents but tended to increase the concentration of trans-10 C(18:1) in rumen samples. Molasses with urea increased ruminal NH(3)-N and milk urea N when cows were fed corn silage diets (6.8 vs. 11.3 and 7.6 vs. 12.0 mg/dL for M vs. MU, respectively). Based on ruminal fermentation characteristics and fatty acid isomers in milk, molasses did not appear to promote ruminal acidosis or milk fat depression. However, combinations of Rumensin with corn silage-based diets already containing molasses and with a relatively high nonfiber carbohydrate:forage neutral detergent fiber ratio influenced biohydrogenation characteristics that are indicators of increased risk for milk fat depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19109286

Citation

Oelker, E R., et al. "Interaction of Molasses and Monensin in Alfalfa Hay- or Corn Silage-based Diets On Rumen Fermentation, Total Tract Digestibility, and Milk Production By Holstein Cows." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 92, no. 1, 2009, pp. 270-85.
Oelker ER, Reveneau C, Firkins JL. Interaction of molasses and monensin in alfalfa hay- or corn silage-based diets on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and milk production by Holstein cows. J Dairy Sci. 2009;92(1):270-85.
Oelker, E. R., Reveneau, C., & Firkins, J. L. (2009). Interaction of molasses and monensin in alfalfa hay- or corn silage-based diets on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and milk production by Holstein cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 92(1), 270-85. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2008-1432
Oelker ER, Reveneau C, Firkins JL. Interaction of Molasses and Monensin in Alfalfa Hay- or Corn Silage-based Diets On Rumen Fermentation, Total Tract Digestibility, and Milk Production By Holstein Cows. J Dairy Sci. 2009;92(1):270-85. PubMed PMID: 19109286.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interaction of molasses and monensin in alfalfa hay- or corn silage-based diets on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and milk production by Holstein cows. AU - Oelker,E R, AU - Reveneau,C, AU - Firkins,J L, PY - 2008/12/26/entrez PY - 2008/12/26/pubmed PY - 2009/2/12/medline SP - 270 EP - 85 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J Dairy Sci VL - 92 IS - 1 N2 - Sugar supplementation can stimulate rumen microbial growth and possibly fiber digestibility; however, excess ruminal carbohydrate availability relative to rumen-degradable protein (RDP) can promote energy spilling by microbes, decrease rumen pH, or depress fiber digestibility. Both RDP supply and rumen pH might be altered by forage source and monensin. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate interactions of a sugar source (molasses) with monensin and 2 forage sources on rumen fermentation, total tract digestibility, and production and fatty acid composition of milk. Seven ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows were used in a 5 x 7 incomplete Latin square design with five 28-d periods. Four corn silage diets consisted of 1) control (C), 2) 2.6% molasses (M), 3) 2.6% molasses plus 0.45% urea (MU), or 4) 2.6% molasses plus 0.45% urea plus monensin sodium (Rumensin, at the intermediate dosage from the label, 16 g/909 kg of dry matter; MUR). Three chopped alfalfa hay diets consisted of 1) control (C), 2) 2.6% molasses (M), or 3) 2.6% molasses plus Rumensin (MR). Urea was added to corn silage diets to provide RDP comparable to alfalfa hay diets with no urea. Corn silage C and M diets were balanced to have 16.2% crude protein; and the remaining diets, 17.2% crude protein. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatment, but there was a trend for lower milk production in alfalfa hay diets compared with corn silage diets. Despite increased total volatile fatty acid and acetate concentrations in the rumen, total tract organic matter digestibility was lower for alfalfa hay-fed cows. Rumensin did not affect volatile fatty acid concentrations but decreased milk fat from 3.22 to 2.72% in corn silage diets but less in alfalfa hay diets. Medium-chain milk fatty acids (% of total fat) were lower for alfalfa hay compared with corn silage diets, and short-chain milk fatty acids tended to decrease when Rumensin was added. In whole rumen contents, concentrations of trans-10, cis-12 C(18:2) were increased when cows were fed corn silage diets. Rumensin had no effect on conjugated linoleic acid isomers in either milk or rumen contents but tended to increase the concentration of trans-10 C(18:1) in rumen samples. Molasses with urea increased ruminal NH(3)-N and milk urea N when cows were fed corn silage diets (6.8 vs. 11.3 and 7.6 vs. 12.0 mg/dL for M vs. MU, respectively). Based on ruminal fermentation characteristics and fatty acid isomers in milk, molasses did not appear to promote ruminal acidosis or milk fat depression. However, combinations of Rumensin with corn silage-based diets already containing molasses and with a relatively high nonfiber carbohydrate:forage neutral detergent fiber ratio influenced biohydrogenation characteristics that are indicators of increased risk for milk fat depression. SN - 1525-3198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19109286/Interaction_of_molasses_and_monensin_in_alfalfa_hay__or_corn_silage_based_diets_on_rumen_fermentation_total_tract_digestibility_and_milk_production_by_Holstein_cows_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(09)70332-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -