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Mutual partner violence: mental health symptoms among female and male victims in four racial/ethnic groups.
J Interpers Violence. 2009 Dec; 24(12):2039-56.JI

Abstract

This study examines racial/ethnic and sex differences in the prevalence of mutual intimate partner violence (IPV) and mental health symptoms. The authors asked 676 university students in heterosexual relationships if they had experienced IPV, coercive victimization, and/or perpetration as well as symptoms of depression, anxiety, hostility, and somatization. Analyses were conducted separately for female and male respondents in four racial/ethnic groups, totaling eight groups (female and male groups each for African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans). Men, as compared to women, reported stronger correlations between IPV perpetration and IPV victimization, with Asian American men reporting the highest associations of any group. Additionally, experiencing higher partner and coercive violence was significantly related to increased mental health symptoms for all groups except Asian American men. Taken together, these findings suggest that the majority of couples experience mutual violence that elicits mental health problems for both members of the couple.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Utah, Utah, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19109532

Citation

Próspero, Moisés, and Miseong Kim. "Mutual Partner Violence: Mental Health Symptoms Among Female and Male Victims in Four Racial/ethnic Groups." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 24, no. 12, 2009, pp. 2039-56.
Próspero M, Kim M. Mutual partner violence: mental health symptoms among female and male victims in four racial/ethnic groups. J Interpers Violence. 2009;24(12):2039-56.
Próspero, M., & Kim, M. (2009). Mutual partner violence: mental health symptoms among female and male victims in four racial/ethnic groups. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 24(12), 2039-56. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260508327705
Próspero M, Kim M. Mutual Partner Violence: Mental Health Symptoms Among Female and Male Victims in Four Racial/ethnic Groups. J Interpers Violence. 2009;24(12):2039-56. PubMed PMID: 19109532.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mutual partner violence: mental health symptoms among female and male victims in four racial/ethnic groups. AU - Próspero,Moisés, AU - Kim,Miseong, Y1 - 2008/12/24/ PY - 2008/12/26/entrez PY - 2008/12/26/pubmed PY - 2010/2/2/medline SP - 2039 EP - 56 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 24 IS - 12 N2 - This study examines racial/ethnic and sex differences in the prevalence of mutual intimate partner violence (IPV) and mental health symptoms. The authors asked 676 university students in heterosexual relationships if they had experienced IPV, coercive victimization, and/or perpetration as well as symptoms of depression, anxiety, hostility, and somatization. Analyses were conducted separately for female and male respondents in four racial/ethnic groups, totaling eight groups (female and male groups each for African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans). Men, as compared to women, reported stronger correlations between IPV perpetration and IPV victimization, with Asian American men reporting the highest associations of any group. Additionally, experiencing higher partner and coercive violence was significantly related to increased mental health symptoms for all groups except Asian American men. Taken together, these findings suggest that the majority of couples experience mutual violence that elicits mental health problems for both members of the couple. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19109532/Mutual_partner_violence:_mental_health_symptoms_among_female_and_male_victims_in_four_racial/ethnic_groups_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260508327705?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -