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Effect of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid intakes from diet and supplements on plasma fatty acid levels in the first 3 years of life.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2008; 17(4):552-7AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The optimal method for conducting omega (n-)3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation trials in children is unknown.

AIM

To assess the impact of n-3 and n-6 PUFA intake from the background diet on plasma levels of n-3 and n-6 PUFA in children aged 0-3 years, with and without n-3 supplementation.

METHODS

Subjects were randomised antenatally to receive either n-3 PUFA supplements and low n-6 PUFA cooking oils and spreads or a control intervention, designed to maintain usual fatty acid intake. Dietary intake was assessed at 18 months by 3-day weighed food record and at 3 years by food frequency questionnaire. Plasma phospholipids were measured at both time points. Associations were tested by regression.

RESULTS

N-3 PUFA intake from background diet did not significantly affect plasma n-3 levels. In contrast, n-6 PUFA intake in background diet was positively related to plasma n-6 levels in both study groups. In addition, n-6 PUFA intake from diet was negatively associated with plasma n-3 levels at 18 months and 3 years (-0.16%/g n-6 intake, 95%CI -0.29 to -0.03 and -0.05%/g n-6 intake, 95%CI -0.09 to -0.01, respectively) in the active group, but not in the control group.

CONCLUSION

Interventions intending to increase plasma n-3 PUFA in children by n-3 supplementation should also minimise n-6 PUFA intake in the background diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Australia. camillah@woolcock.org.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19114389

Citation

Hoyos, Camilla, et al. "Effect of Omega 3 and Omega 6 Fatty Acid Intakes From Diet and Supplements On Plasma Fatty Acid Levels in the First 3 Years of Life." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 4, 2008, pp. 552-7.
Hoyos C, Almqvist C, Garden F, et al. Effect of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid intakes from diet and supplements on plasma fatty acid levels in the first 3 years of life. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(4):552-7.
Hoyos, C., Almqvist, C., Garden, F., Xuan, W., Oddy, W. H., Marks, G. B., & Webb, K. L. (2008). Effect of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid intakes from diet and supplements on plasma fatty acid levels in the first 3 years of life. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17(4), pp. 552-7.
Hoyos C, et al. Effect of Omega 3 and Omega 6 Fatty Acid Intakes From Diet and Supplements On Plasma Fatty Acid Levels in the First 3 Years of Life. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(4):552-7. PubMed PMID: 19114389.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid intakes from diet and supplements on plasma fatty acid levels in the first 3 years of life. AU - Hoyos,Camilla, AU - Almqvist,Catarina, AU - Garden,Frances, AU - Xuan,Wei, AU - Oddy,Wendy H, AU - Marks,Guy B, AU - Webb,Karen L, PY - 2008/12/31/entrez PY - 2008/12/31/pubmed PY - 2009/4/8/medline SP - 552 EP - 7 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The optimal method for conducting omega (n-)3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation trials in children is unknown. AIM: To assess the impact of n-3 and n-6 PUFA intake from the background diet on plasma levels of n-3 and n-6 PUFA in children aged 0-3 years, with and without n-3 supplementation. METHODS: Subjects were randomised antenatally to receive either n-3 PUFA supplements and low n-6 PUFA cooking oils and spreads or a control intervention, designed to maintain usual fatty acid intake. Dietary intake was assessed at 18 months by 3-day weighed food record and at 3 years by food frequency questionnaire. Plasma phospholipids were measured at both time points. Associations were tested by regression. RESULTS: N-3 PUFA intake from background diet did not significantly affect plasma n-3 levels. In contrast, n-6 PUFA intake in background diet was positively related to plasma n-6 levels in both study groups. In addition, n-6 PUFA intake from diet was negatively associated with plasma n-3 levels at 18 months and 3 years (-0.16%/g n-6 intake, 95%CI -0.29 to -0.03 and -0.05%/g n-6 intake, 95%CI -0.09 to -0.01, respectively) in the active group, but not in the control group. CONCLUSION: Interventions intending to increase plasma n-3 PUFA in children by n-3 supplementation should also minimise n-6 PUFA intake in the background diet. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19114389/Effect_of_omega_3_and_omega_6_fatty_acid_intakes_from_diet_and_supplements_on_plasma_fatty_acid_levels_in_the_first_3_years_of_life_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/17/4/552.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -