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Reported analgesic administration to rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates undergoing experimental surgical procedures.

Abstract

Reported analgesic use following experimental surgery is low in rodents and there has been little published information on the frequency of analgesic use in other laboratory species. A structured literature review was conducted to examine analgesic administration in larger laboratory animals. The Scirus search engine was used to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals that reported carrying out experimental surgery on 'large' laboratory animals, specifically rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates. Seventy-four studies between 2000 and 2001 and 75 studies between 2005 and 2006 were included in the review. There was an increase in the reported administration of systemic analgesics to these species from 50% in 2000-2001 to 63% in 2005-2006. When all agents with analgesic properties were considered (systemic analgesics, local anaesthetics and anaesthetics with analgesic components), the proportion of papers that reported some form of analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory animals increased from 86% in 2000-2001 to 89% in 2005-2006. Overall rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates were more likely to receive analgesics following potentially painful experimental procedures than has been reported in laboratory rodents but analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory species is still not optimal.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Comparative Biology Centre, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK.

    ,

    Source

    Laboratory animals 43:3 2009 Jul pg 232-8

    MeSH

    Analgesia
    Analgesics
    Animal Welfare
    Animals
    Animals, Laboratory
    Dogs
    Pain, Postoperative
    Rabbits
    Sheep
    Species Specificity
    Surgery, Veterinary
    Swine

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19116294

    Citation

    Coulter, C A., et al. "Reported Analgesic Administration to Rabbits, Pigs, Sheep, Dogs and Non-human Primates Undergoing Experimental Surgical Procedures." Laboratory Animals, vol. 43, no. 3, 2009, pp. 232-8.
    Coulter CA, Flecknell PA, Richardson CA. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Lab Anim. 2009;43(3):232-8.
    Coulter, C. A., Flecknell, P. A., & Richardson, C. A. (2009). Reported analgesic administration to rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Laboratory Animals, 43(3), pp. 232-8. doi:10.1258/la.2008.008021.
    Coulter CA, Flecknell PA, Richardson CA. Reported Analgesic Administration to Rabbits, Pigs, Sheep, Dogs and Non-human Primates Undergoing Experimental Surgical Procedures. Lab Anim. 2009;43(3):232-8. PubMed PMID: 19116294.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Reported analgesic administration to rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates undergoing experimental surgical procedures. AU - Coulter,C A, AU - Flecknell,P A, AU - Richardson,C A, Y1 - 2008/12/30/ PY - 2009/1/1/entrez PY - 2009/1/1/pubmed PY - 2009/9/18/medline SP - 232 EP - 8 JF - Laboratory animals JO - Lab. Anim. VL - 43 IS - 3 N2 - Reported analgesic use following experimental surgery is low in rodents and there has been little published information on the frequency of analgesic use in other laboratory species. A structured literature review was conducted to examine analgesic administration in larger laboratory animals. The Scirus search engine was used to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals that reported carrying out experimental surgery on 'large' laboratory animals, specifically rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates. Seventy-four studies between 2000 and 2001 and 75 studies between 2005 and 2006 were included in the review. There was an increase in the reported administration of systemic analgesics to these species from 50% in 2000-2001 to 63% in 2005-2006. When all agents with analgesic properties were considered (systemic analgesics, local anaesthetics and anaesthetics with analgesic components), the proportion of papers that reported some form of analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory animals increased from 86% in 2000-2001 to 89% in 2005-2006. Overall rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates were more likely to receive analgesics following potentially painful experimental procedures than has been reported in laboratory rodents but analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory species is still not optimal. SN - 0023-6772 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19116294/Reported_analgesic_administration_to_rabbits_pigs_sheep_dogs_and_non_human_primates_undergoing_experimental_surgical_procedures L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1258/la.2008.008021?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -