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Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2008 Dec; 102 Suppl 1:S26-9.TR

Abstract

Melioidosis, an infection due to the environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, with cases strongly correlated with the monsoonal wet season. We hypothesized that seasonal variation in the mode of acquisition, informed by traditional knowledge, would result in variations in disease characteristics as well as disease incidence. We explored the seasonal variation in acute, culture-confirmed melioidosis using local Aboriginal definitions of seasons in presentations to the Royal Darwin Hospital, the referral centre for the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. In 387 patients, we observed an increased proportion of patients with pneumonia (60%) and severe sepsis (25%) associated with presentations in the wet seasons Gunumeleng (October-December) and Gudjewg (January-March) compared with the drier seasons Wurrgeng (June August) and Gurrung (August-October) (pneumonia 26%, severe sepsis 13%). This observation supports the hypothesis that in the wet seasons there may be changes in the mode and/or magnitude of exposure to B. pseudomallei, with a shift from percutaneous inoculation to aerosol inhalation, for instance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, c/o Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, 9th floor, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia. allen.cheng@menzies.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19121681

Citation

Cheng, Allen C., et al. "Melioidosis and Aboriginal Seasons in Northern Australia." Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 102 Suppl 1, 2008, pp. S26-9.
Cheng AC, Jacups SP, Ward L, et al. Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2008;102 Suppl 1:S26-9.
Cheng, A. C., Jacups, S. P., Ward, L., & Currie, B. J. (2008). Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 102 Suppl 1, S26-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0035-9203(08)70008-7
Cheng AC, et al. Melioidosis and Aboriginal Seasons in Northern Australia. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2008;102 Suppl 1:S26-9. PubMed PMID: 19121681.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia. AU - Cheng,Allen C, AU - Jacups,Susan P, AU - Ward,Linda, AU - Currie,Bart J, PY - 2009/1/6/entrez PY - 2009/1/16/pubmed PY - 2009/11/11/medline SP - S26 EP - 9 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg VL - 102 Suppl 1 N2 - Melioidosis, an infection due to the environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, with cases strongly correlated with the monsoonal wet season. We hypothesized that seasonal variation in the mode of acquisition, informed by traditional knowledge, would result in variations in disease characteristics as well as disease incidence. We explored the seasonal variation in acute, culture-confirmed melioidosis using local Aboriginal definitions of seasons in presentations to the Royal Darwin Hospital, the referral centre for the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. In 387 patients, we observed an increased proportion of patients with pneumonia (60%) and severe sepsis (25%) associated with presentations in the wet seasons Gunumeleng (October-December) and Gudjewg (January-March) compared with the drier seasons Wurrgeng (June August) and Gurrung (August-October) (pneumonia 26%, severe sepsis 13%). This observation supports the hypothesis that in the wet seasons there may be changes in the mode and/or magnitude of exposure to B. pseudomallei, with a shift from percutaneous inoculation to aerosol inhalation, for instance. SN - 1878-3503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19121681/Melioidosis_and_Aboriginal_seasons_in_northern_Australia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0035-9203(08)70008-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -