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Effects of static stretching on repeated sprint and change of direction performance.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Feb; 41(2):444-50.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine the effects of static stretching during the recovery periods of field-based team sports on subsequent repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction speed (CODS) performance.

METHODS

On four separate occasions, 12 male team-sport players performed a standardized warm-up, followed by a test of either RSA or CODS (on two occasions each) in a counterbalanced design. Both tests involved three sets of six maximal sprint repetitions, with a 4-min recovery between sets. During the break between sets, the participants either rested (control [CON]) or completed a static stretching protocol (static stretch [SS]). The RSA test involved straight-line sprints, whereas the CODS test required a change of direction (100 degrees) every 4 m (total of four). Mean, total (sum of six sprints), first, and best sprint times (MST, TST, FST, and BST, respectively) were recorded for each set.

RESULTS

There was a consistent tendency for RSA times to be slower after the static stretching intervention, which was supported by statistical significance for three performance variables (MST 0-5 m set 2, MST 0-20 m set 2, and TST set 2; P < 0.05). This tendency was also supported by moderate effect sizes and qualitative indications of "likely" harmful or detrimental effects associated with RSA-SS. Further, sprint times again tended to be slower in the CODS-SS trial compared with the CODS-CON across all sprint variables, with a significantly slower (P < 0.05) BST recorded for set 3 after static stretching.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest that an acute bout (4 min) of static stretching of the lower limbs during recovery periods between efforts may compromise RSA performance but has less effect on CODS performance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19127179

Citation

Beckett, James R J., et al. "Effects of Static Stretching On Repeated Sprint and Change of Direction Performance." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 41, no. 2, 2009, pp. 444-50.
Beckett JR, Schneiker KT, Wallman KE, et al. Effects of static stretching on repeated sprint and change of direction performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(2):444-50.
Beckett, J. R., Schneiker, K. T., Wallman, K. E., Dawson, B. T., & Guelfi, K. J. (2009). Effects of static stretching on repeated sprint and change of direction performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 41(2), 444-50. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181867b95
Beckett JR, et al. Effects of Static Stretching On Repeated Sprint and Change of Direction Performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(2):444-50. PubMed PMID: 19127179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of static stretching on repeated sprint and change of direction performance. AU - Beckett,James R J, AU - Schneiker,Knut T, AU - Wallman,Karen E, AU - Dawson,Brian T, AU - Guelfi,Kym J, PY - 2009/1/8/entrez PY - 2009/1/8/pubmed PY - 2009/5/9/medline SP - 444 EP - 50 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 41 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine the effects of static stretching during the recovery periods of field-based team sports on subsequent repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction speed (CODS) performance. METHODS: On four separate occasions, 12 male team-sport players performed a standardized warm-up, followed by a test of either RSA or CODS (on two occasions each) in a counterbalanced design. Both tests involved three sets of six maximal sprint repetitions, with a 4-min recovery between sets. During the break between sets, the participants either rested (control [CON]) or completed a static stretching protocol (static stretch [SS]). The RSA test involved straight-line sprints, whereas the CODS test required a change of direction (100 degrees) every 4 m (total of four). Mean, total (sum of six sprints), first, and best sprint times (MST, TST, FST, and BST, respectively) were recorded for each set. RESULTS: There was a consistent tendency for RSA times to be slower after the static stretching intervention, which was supported by statistical significance for three performance variables (MST 0-5 m set 2, MST 0-20 m set 2, and TST set 2; P < 0.05). This tendency was also supported by moderate effect sizes and qualitative indications of "likely" harmful or detrimental effects associated with RSA-SS. Further, sprint times again tended to be slower in the CODS-SS trial compared with the CODS-CON across all sprint variables, with a significantly slower (P < 0.05) BST recorded for set 3 after static stretching. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that an acute bout (4 min) of static stretching of the lower limbs during recovery periods between efforts may compromise RSA performance but has less effect on CODS performance. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19127179/Effects_of_static_stretching_on_repeated_sprint_and_change_of_direction_performance_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181867b95 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -