Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Improving asthma self-efficacy: developing and testing a pilot community-based asthma intervention for African American adults.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Jan; 123(1):153-159.e3.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Low-income African American adults in Chicago have disproportionately high asthma morbidity and mortality rates. Interventions that improve asthma self-efficacy for appropriate self-management behaviors might ultimately improve asthma control in this population.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to pilot test an intervention to improve asthma self-efficacy for appropriate self-management behaviors.

METHODS

Participants for this trial were recruited through 2 primary care clinics located in the largest African American community in Chicago. Participants were then randomized into one of 2 groups. The control group received mailed asthma education materials. The intervention group was offered 4 group sessions led by a community social worker and 6 home visits by community health workers. Telephone interviews were conducted at baseline (before intervention), 3 months (after intervention), and 6 months (maintenance).

RESULTS

The 42 participants were predominantly African American and low income and had poorly controlled persistent asthma. The intervention group had significantly higher asthma self-efficacy at 3 months (P < .001) after the completion of the intervention. Asthma action plans were more common in the intervention group at 3 months (P = .06). At 6 months, the intervention group had improved asthma quality of life (P = .002) and improved coping (P = .01) compared with control subjects. Trends in behavioral and clinical outcomes favored the intervention group but were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

This community-based asthma intervention improved asthma self-efficacy, self-perceived coping skills, and asthma quality of life for low-income African American adults. Larger trials are needed to test the efficacy of this intervention to reduce asthma morbidity in similar high-risk populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. molly_a_martin@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19130936

Citation

Martin, Molly A., et al. "Improving Asthma Self-efficacy: Developing and Testing a Pilot Community-based Asthma Intervention for African American Adults." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 123, no. 1, 2009, pp. 153-159.e3.
Martin MA, Catrambone CD, Kee RA, et al. Improving asthma self-efficacy: developing and testing a pilot community-based asthma intervention for African American adults. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009;123(1):153-159.e3.
Martin, M. A., Catrambone, C. D., Kee, R. A., Evans, A. T., Sharp, L. K., Lyttle, C., Rucker-Whitaker, C., Weiss, K. B., & Shannon, J. J. (2009). Improving asthma self-efficacy: developing and testing a pilot community-based asthma intervention for African American adults. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 123(1), 153-e3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2008.10.057
Martin MA, et al. Improving Asthma Self-efficacy: Developing and Testing a Pilot Community-based Asthma Intervention for African American Adults. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009;123(1):153-159.e3. PubMed PMID: 19130936.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improving asthma self-efficacy: developing and testing a pilot community-based asthma intervention for African American adults. AU - Martin,Molly A, AU - Catrambone,Catherine D, AU - Kee,Romina A, AU - Evans,Arthur T, AU - Sharp,Lisa K, AU - Lyttle,Christopher, AU - Rucker-Whitaker,Cheryl, AU - Weiss,Kevin B, AU - Shannon,John Jay, AU - ,, PY - 2008/05/02/received PY - 2008/10/23/revised PY - 2008/10/27/accepted PY - 2009/1/10/entrez PY - 2009/1/10/pubmed PY - 2009/1/28/medline SP - 153 EP - 159.e3 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 123 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Low-income African American adults in Chicago have disproportionately high asthma morbidity and mortality rates. Interventions that improve asthma self-efficacy for appropriate self-management behaviors might ultimately improve asthma control in this population. OBJECTIVE: We sought to pilot test an intervention to improve asthma self-efficacy for appropriate self-management behaviors. METHODS: Participants for this trial were recruited through 2 primary care clinics located in the largest African American community in Chicago. Participants were then randomized into one of 2 groups. The control group received mailed asthma education materials. The intervention group was offered 4 group sessions led by a community social worker and 6 home visits by community health workers. Telephone interviews were conducted at baseline (before intervention), 3 months (after intervention), and 6 months (maintenance). RESULTS: The 42 participants were predominantly African American and low income and had poorly controlled persistent asthma. The intervention group had significantly higher asthma self-efficacy at 3 months (P < .001) after the completion of the intervention. Asthma action plans were more common in the intervention group at 3 months (P = .06). At 6 months, the intervention group had improved asthma quality of life (P = .002) and improved coping (P = .01) compared with control subjects. Trends in behavioral and clinical outcomes favored the intervention group but were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: This community-based asthma intervention improved asthma self-efficacy, self-perceived coping skills, and asthma quality of life for low-income African American adults. Larger trials are needed to test the efficacy of this intervention to reduce asthma morbidity in similar high-risk populations. SN - 1097-6825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19130936/Improving_asthma_self_efficacy:_developing_and_testing_a_pilot_community_based_asthma_intervention_for_African_American_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(08)02175-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -