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Sleep habits and susceptibility to the common cold.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sleep quality is thought to be an important predictor of immunity and, in turn, susceptibility to the common cold. This article examines whether sleep duration and efficiency in the weeks preceding viral exposure are associated with cold susceptibility.

METHODS

A total of 153 healthy men and women (age range, 21-55 years) volunteered to participate in the study. For 14 consecutive days, they reported their sleep duration and sleep efficiency (percentage of time in bed actually asleep) for the previous night and whether they felt rested. Average scores for each sleep variable were calculated over the 14-day baseline. Subsequently, participants were quarantined, administered nasal drops containing a rhinovirus, and monitored for the development of a clinical cold (infection in the presence of objective signs of illness) on the day before and for 5 days after exposure.

RESULTS

There was a graded association with average sleep duration: participants with less than 7 hours of sleep were 2.94 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-7.30) more likely to develop a cold than those with 8 hours or more of sleep. The association with sleep efficiency was also graded: participants with less than 92% efficiency were 5.50 times (95% CI, 2.08-14.48) more likely to develop a cold than those with 98% or more efficiency. These relationships could not be explained by differences in prechallenge virus-specific antibody titers, demographics, season of the year, body mass, socioeconomic status, psychological variables, or health practices. The percentage of days feeling rested was not associated with colds.

CONCLUSION

Poorer sleep efficiency and shorter sleep duration in the weeks preceding exposure to a rhinovirus were associated with lower resistance to illness.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. scohen@cmu.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    Archives of internal medicine 169:1 2009 Jan 12 pg 62-7

    MeSH

    Adult
    Cohort Studies
    Common Cold
    Confidence Intervals
    Disease Susceptibility
    Female
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Odds Ratio
    Polysomnography
    Predictive Value of Tests
    Prevalence
    Probability
    Reference Values
    Risk Factors
    Sleep
    Sleep Wake Disorders
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19139325

    Citation

    Cohen, Sheldon, et al. "Sleep Habits and Susceptibility to the Common Cold." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 169, no. 1, 2009, pp. 62-7.
    Cohen S, Doyle WJ, Alper CM, et al. Sleep habits and susceptibility to the common cold. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(1):62-7.
    Cohen, S., Doyle, W. J., Alper, C. M., Janicki-Deverts, D., & Turner, R. B. (2009). Sleep habits and susceptibility to the common cold. Archives of Internal Medicine, 169(1), pp. 62-7. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2008.505.
    Cohen S, et al. Sleep Habits and Susceptibility to the Common Cold. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Jan 12;169(1):62-7. PubMed PMID: 19139325.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep habits and susceptibility to the common cold. AU - Cohen,Sheldon, AU - Doyle,William J, AU - Alper,Cuneyt M, AU - Janicki-Deverts,Denise, AU - Turner,Ronald B, PY - 2009/1/14/entrez PY - 2009/1/14/pubmed PY - 2009/1/31/medline SP - 62 EP - 7 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 169 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sleep quality is thought to be an important predictor of immunity and, in turn, susceptibility to the common cold. This article examines whether sleep duration and efficiency in the weeks preceding viral exposure are associated with cold susceptibility. METHODS: A total of 153 healthy men and women (age range, 21-55 years) volunteered to participate in the study. For 14 consecutive days, they reported their sleep duration and sleep efficiency (percentage of time in bed actually asleep) for the previous night and whether they felt rested. Average scores for each sleep variable were calculated over the 14-day baseline. Subsequently, participants were quarantined, administered nasal drops containing a rhinovirus, and monitored for the development of a clinical cold (infection in the presence of objective signs of illness) on the day before and for 5 days after exposure. RESULTS: There was a graded association with average sleep duration: participants with less than 7 hours of sleep were 2.94 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-7.30) more likely to develop a cold than those with 8 hours or more of sleep. The association with sleep efficiency was also graded: participants with less than 92% efficiency were 5.50 times (95% CI, 2.08-14.48) more likely to develop a cold than those with 98% or more efficiency. These relationships could not be explained by differences in prechallenge virus-specific antibody titers, demographics, season of the year, body mass, socioeconomic status, psychological variables, or health practices. The percentage of days feeling rested was not associated with colds. CONCLUSION: Poorer sleep efficiency and shorter sleep duration in the weeks preceding exposure to a rhinovirus were associated with lower resistance to illness. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19139325/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinternmed.2008.505 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -