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Threat inoculation: experienced and imagined intergenerational contact prevents stereotype threat effects on older people's math performance.
Psychol Aging. 2008 Dec; 23(4):934-9.PA

Abstract

The authors hypothesized that experienced and imagined intergenerational contact should improve older people's math test performance under stereotype threat. In Experiment 1 (N=51, mean age=69 years), positive prior contact with grandchildren eliminated stereotype threat, which was mediated partially by reduced test-related anxiety. In Experiment 2 (N=84, mean age=72 years), the effect of threat on performance was significantly improved when participants merely imagined intergenerational contact, a situation again mediated by reduced anxiety. Previous research established that intergroup contact improves intergroup attitudes. The findings show that intergroup (intergenerational) contact also provides a defense against stereotype threat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. d.abrams@kent.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19140662

Citation

Abrams, Dominic, et al. "Threat Inoculation: Experienced and Imagined Intergenerational Contact Prevents Stereotype Threat Effects On Older People's Math Performance." Psychology and Aging, vol. 23, no. 4, 2008, pp. 934-9.
Abrams D, Crisp RJ, Marques S, et al. Threat inoculation: experienced and imagined intergenerational contact prevents stereotype threat effects on older people's math performance. Psychol Aging. 2008;23(4):934-9.
Abrams, D., Crisp, R. J., Marques, S., Fagg, E., Bedford, L., & Provias, D. (2008). Threat inoculation: experienced and imagined intergenerational contact prevents stereotype threat effects on older people's math performance. Psychology and Aging, 23(4), 934-9. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014293
Abrams D, et al. Threat Inoculation: Experienced and Imagined Intergenerational Contact Prevents Stereotype Threat Effects On Older People's Math Performance. Psychol Aging. 2008;23(4):934-9. PubMed PMID: 19140662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Threat inoculation: experienced and imagined intergenerational contact prevents stereotype threat effects on older people's math performance. AU - Abrams,Dominic, AU - Crisp,Richard J, AU - Marques,Sibila, AU - Fagg,Emily, AU - Bedford,Lauren, AU - Provias,Dimitri, PY - 2009/1/15/entrez PY - 2009/1/15/pubmed PY - 2009/3/24/medline SP - 934 EP - 9 JF - Psychology and aging JO - Psychol Aging VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - The authors hypothesized that experienced and imagined intergenerational contact should improve older people's math test performance under stereotype threat. In Experiment 1 (N=51, mean age=69 years), positive prior contact with grandchildren eliminated stereotype threat, which was mediated partially by reduced test-related anxiety. In Experiment 2 (N=84, mean age=72 years), the effect of threat on performance was significantly improved when participants merely imagined intergenerational contact, a situation again mediated by reduced anxiety. Previous research established that intergroup contact improves intergroup attitudes. The findings show that intergroup (intergenerational) contact also provides a defense against stereotype threat. SN - 0882-7974 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19140662/Threat_inoculation:_experienced_and_imagined_intergenerational_contact_prevents_stereotype_threat_effects_on_older_people's_math_performance_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pag/23/4/934 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -