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Reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases among male hospital inpatients with problem drinking.

Abstract

AIMS

The aim of this study was to examine if problem drinkers have varying risks of having alcohol-related diseases according to their reported beverage consumed.

METHODS

In a cross-sectional study all consecutive inpatients aged 18- 64 years from four general hospitals of one catchment area were systematically screened for alcohol use. A total of 1011 men with problem drinking were used for this study. Routine treatment diagnoses for all participants were provided by hospital physicians and were classified into three categories according to their alcohol-attributable fractions (AAF; AAF = 0; AAF < 1; AAF = 1).

RESULTS

According to their reported beverage consumed, 53.0% of the participants were identified as exclusively beer drinkers, 14.1% exclusively spirits drinkers, 26.0% mixed beer and spirits drinkers and 6.9% individuals drinking wine exclusively or in combination with one or two other beverages (mixed wine drinkers). Compared to spirits drinkers and controlling for possible confounders (i.e. alcohol-associated characteristics, demographic variables), multinomial regressions revealed that beer drinkers, mixed beer and spirits drinkers, and mixed wine drinkers had lower odds of having diseases with AAF = 1 than spirits drinkers (e.g. for AAF = 1: beer versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.42, CI: 0.25-0.72). Beer drinkers and mixed wine drinkers also had lower odds of having diseases with AAF < 1 than spirits drinkers (e.g. mixed wine versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.36, CI: 0.18-0.72).

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest an association between the reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases. Among hospitalized problem drinkers, spirits drinkers had the greatest risk of having diseases with AAF < 1 and with AAF = 1.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, Greifswald, Germany. coder@uni-greifswald.de

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcohol-Related Disorders
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Beer
    Data Interpretation, Statistical
    Germany
    Humans
    Inpatients
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk
    Smoking
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Treatment Outcome
    Wine
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19141482

    Citation

    Coder, Beate, et al. "Reported Beverage Consumed and Alcohol-related Diseases Among Male Hospital Inpatients With Problem Drinking." Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), vol. 44, no. 2, 2009, pp. 216-21.
    Coder B, Freyer-Adam J, Lau K, et al. Reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases among male hospital inpatients with problem drinking. Alcohol Alcohol. 2009;44(2):216-21.
    Coder, B., Freyer-Adam, J., Lau, K., Riedel, J., Rumpf, H. J., Meyer, C., ... Hapke, U. (2009). Reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases among male hospital inpatients with problem drinking. Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 44(2), pp. 216-21. doi:10.1093/alcalc/agn113.
    Coder B, et al. Reported Beverage Consumed and Alcohol-related Diseases Among Male Hospital Inpatients With Problem Drinking. Alcohol Alcohol. 2009;44(2):216-21. PubMed PMID: 19141482.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases among male hospital inpatients with problem drinking. AU - Coder,Beate, AU - Freyer-Adam,Jennis, AU - Lau,Katharina, AU - Riedel,Jeannette, AU - Rumpf,Hans-Jürgen, AU - Meyer,Christian, AU - John,Ulrich, AU - Hapke,Ulfert, Y1 - 2009/01/12/ PY - 2009/1/15/entrez PY - 2009/1/15/pubmed PY - 2009/4/11/medline SP - 216 EP - 21 JF - Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire) JO - Alcohol Alcohol. VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine if problem drinkers have varying risks of having alcohol-related diseases according to their reported beverage consumed. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study all consecutive inpatients aged 18- 64 years from four general hospitals of one catchment area were systematically screened for alcohol use. A total of 1011 men with problem drinking were used for this study. Routine treatment diagnoses for all participants were provided by hospital physicians and were classified into three categories according to their alcohol-attributable fractions (AAF; AAF = 0; AAF < 1; AAF = 1). RESULTS: According to their reported beverage consumed, 53.0% of the participants were identified as exclusively beer drinkers, 14.1% exclusively spirits drinkers, 26.0% mixed beer and spirits drinkers and 6.9% individuals drinking wine exclusively or in combination with one or two other beverages (mixed wine drinkers). Compared to spirits drinkers and controlling for possible confounders (i.e. alcohol-associated characteristics, demographic variables), multinomial regressions revealed that beer drinkers, mixed beer and spirits drinkers, and mixed wine drinkers had lower odds of having diseases with AAF = 1 than spirits drinkers (e.g. for AAF = 1: beer versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.42, CI: 0.25-0.72). Beer drinkers and mixed wine drinkers also had lower odds of having diseases with AAF < 1 than spirits drinkers (e.g. mixed wine versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.36, CI: 0.18-0.72). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest an association between the reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases. Among hospitalized problem drinkers, spirits drinkers had the greatest risk of having diseases with AAF < 1 and with AAF = 1. SN - 1464-3502 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19141482/Reported_beverage_consumed_and_alcohol_related_diseases_among_male_hospital_inpatients_with_problem_drinking_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/alcalc/agn113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -