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Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance.
J Neurophysiol. 2009 Mar; 101(3):1575-87.JN

Abstract

The striatum and hippocampus are widely held to be components of distinct memory systems that can guide competing behavioral strategies. However, some electrophysiological studies have suggested that neurons in both structures encode spatial information and may therefore make similar contributions to behavior. In rats well trained to perform a win-stay radial maze task, we recorded simultaneously from dorsal hippocampus and from multiple striatal subregions, including both lateral areas implicated in motor responses to cues and medial areas that work cooperatively with hippocampus in cognitive operations. In each brain region, movement through the maze was accompanied by the continuous sequential activation of sets of projection neurons. Hippocampal neurons overwhelmingly were active at a single spatial location (place cells). Striatal projection neurons were active at discrete points within the progression of every trial-especially during choices or following reward delivery-regardless of spatial position. Place-cell-type firing was not observed even for medial striatal cells entrained to the hippocampal theta rhythm. We also examined neural coding in earlier training sessions, when rats made use of spatial working memory to guide choices, and again found that striatal cells did not show place-cell-type firing. Prospective or retrospective encoding of trajectory was not observed in either hippocampus or striatum, at either training stage. Our results indicate that, at least in this task, dorsal hippocampus uses a spatial foundation for information processing that is not substantially modulated by spatial working memory demands. By contrast, striatal cells do not use such a spatial foundation, even in medial subregions that cooperate with hippocampus in the selection of spatial strategies. The progressive dominance of a striatum-dependent strategy does not appear to be accompanied by large changes in striatal or hippocampal single-cell representations, suggesting that the conflict between strategies may be resolved elsewhere.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1109, USA. jdberke@umich.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19144741

Citation

Berke, Joshua D., et al. "Striatal Versus Hippocampal Representations During Win-stay Maze Performance." Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 101, no. 3, 2009, pp. 1575-87.
Berke JD, Breck JT, Eichenbaum H. Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance. J Neurophysiol. 2009;101(3):1575-87.
Berke, J. D., Breck, J. T., & Eichenbaum, H. (2009). Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance. Journal of Neurophysiology, 101(3), 1575-87. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.91106.2008
Berke JD, Breck JT, Eichenbaum H. Striatal Versus Hippocampal Representations During Win-stay Maze Performance. J Neurophysiol. 2009;101(3):1575-87. PubMed PMID: 19144741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance. AU - Berke,Joshua D, AU - Breck,Jason T, AU - Eichenbaum,Howard, Y1 - 2009/01/14/ PY - 2009/1/16/entrez PY - 2009/1/16/pubmed PY - 2009/4/21/medline SP - 1575 EP - 87 JF - Journal of neurophysiology JO - J Neurophysiol VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - The striatum and hippocampus are widely held to be components of distinct memory systems that can guide competing behavioral strategies. However, some electrophysiological studies have suggested that neurons in both structures encode spatial information and may therefore make similar contributions to behavior. In rats well trained to perform a win-stay radial maze task, we recorded simultaneously from dorsal hippocampus and from multiple striatal subregions, including both lateral areas implicated in motor responses to cues and medial areas that work cooperatively with hippocampus in cognitive operations. In each brain region, movement through the maze was accompanied by the continuous sequential activation of sets of projection neurons. Hippocampal neurons overwhelmingly were active at a single spatial location (place cells). Striatal projection neurons were active at discrete points within the progression of every trial-especially during choices or following reward delivery-regardless of spatial position. Place-cell-type firing was not observed even for medial striatal cells entrained to the hippocampal theta rhythm. We also examined neural coding in earlier training sessions, when rats made use of spatial working memory to guide choices, and again found that striatal cells did not show place-cell-type firing. Prospective or retrospective encoding of trajectory was not observed in either hippocampus or striatum, at either training stage. Our results indicate that, at least in this task, dorsal hippocampus uses a spatial foundation for information processing that is not substantially modulated by spatial working memory demands. By contrast, striatal cells do not use such a spatial foundation, even in medial subregions that cooperate with hippocampus in the selection of spatial strategies. The progressive dominance of a striatum-dependent strategy does not appear to be accompanied by large changes in striatal or hippocampal single-cell representations, suggesting that the conflict between strategies may be resolved elsewhere. SN - 0022-3077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19144741/Striatal_versus_hippocampal_representations_during_win_stay_maze_performance_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jn.91106.2008?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -