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Potential genotoxicity of plant extracts used in Ethiopian traditional medicine.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Feb 25; 122(1):136-42.JE

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY

Although traditional herbal medicines are widely used in Ethiopia, no information is available on their potential genotoxicity. In the present study, hydroalcoholic extracts of Glinus lotoides, Plumbago zeylanica, Rumex steudelii and Thymus schimperi were evaluated for their DNA damaging effects using the comet assay.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were exposed to different concentrations of the extracts for 3h with and without metabolic activation (S9-mix) using 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and benzo(a)pyrene as positive controls, and vehicles as negative controls.

RESULTS

In the absence of S9, all extracts were found to induce significant DNA damage without affecting the cell viability. T. schimperi and R. steudelii were the most potent DNA-damaging extracts, and G. lotoides and P. zeylanica the least potent. The addition of S9 had different effects on the DNA damage induced by the extracts: it lowered the DNA damaging effect of P. zeylanica, did not affect the DNA damaging effect of T. schimperi, and increased the DNA damaging effects of R. steudelii and G. lotoides.

CONCLUSION

The findings of the present study suggest that all extracts evaluated have a genotoxic potential in vitro which needs to be substantiated by further studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Division of Toxicology, Uppsala University, Box 594, 751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19146933

Citation

Demma, J, et al. "Potential Genotoxicity of Plant Extracts Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 122, no. 1, 2009, pp. 136-42.
Demma J, Engidawork E, Hellman B. Potential genotoxicity of plant extracts used in Ethiopian traditional medicine. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009;122(1):136-42.
Demma, J., Engidawork, E., & Hellman, B. (2009). Potential genotoxicity of plant extracts used in Ethiopian traditional medicine. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 122(1), 136-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2008.12.013
Demma J, Engidawork E, Hellman B. Potential Genotoxicity of Plant Extracts Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Feb 25;122(1):136-42. PubMed PMID: 19146933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential genotoxicity of plant extracts used in Ethiopian traditional medicine. AU - Demma,J, AU - Engidawork,E, AU - Hellman,B, Y1 - 2008/12/25/ PY - 2008/08/12/received PY - 2008/12/10/revised PY - 2008/12/16/accepted PY - 2009/1/17/entrez PY - 2009/1/17/pubmed PY - 2009/6/10/medline SP - 136 EP - 42 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 122 IS - 1 N2 - AIM OF THE STUDY: Although traditional herbal medicines are widely used in Ethiopia, no information is available on their potential genotoxicity. In the present study, hydroalcoholic extracts of Glinus lotoides, Plumbago zeylanica, Rumex steudelii and Thymus schimperi were evaluated for their DNA damaging effects using the comet assay. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were exposed to different concentrations of the extracts for 3h with and without metabolic activation (S9-mix) using 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and benzo(a)pyrene as positive controls, and vehicles as negative controls. RESULTS: In the absence of S9, all extracts were found to induce significant DNA damage without affecting the cell viability. T. schimperi and R. steudelii were the most potent DNA-damaging extracts, and G. lotoides and P. zeylanica the least potent. The addition of S9 had different effects on the DNA damage induced by the extracts: it lowered the DNA damaging effect of P. zeylanica, did not affect the DNA damaging effect of T. schimperi, and increased the DNA damaging effects of R. steudelii and G. lotoides. CONCLUSION: The findings of the present study suggest that all extracts evaluated have a genotoxic potential in vitro which needs to be substantiated by further studies. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19146933/Potential_genotoxicity_of_plant_extracts_used_in_Ethiopian_traditional_medicine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(08)00701-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -