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gamma-Glutamyltransferase, obesity, physical activity, and the metabolic syndrome in indigenous Australian adults.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Apr; 17(4):809-13.O

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine the association between obesity, metabolic syndrome, physical activity, and elevated gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) among Indigenous Australian adults who did not drink alcohol. A cross-sectional study of 791 Indigenous adults in rural North Queensland communities was conducted between 1999 and 2001. Measures included serum GGT, fasting glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides; resting blood pressure, BMI, and waist circumference; and self-reported physical activity, alcohol intake, and tobacco smoking. Central obesity measured by waist circumference in this population was significantly associated with elevated GGT independently of lifestyle behaviors (Adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-6.0). Metabolic syndrome (International Diabetes Federation definition) was also strongly associated with increased GGT (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.5-4.6). Habitual physical activity may be slightly protective (OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.5-1.6) in this group, but this was not clearly demonstrated in this study. Prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this population should emphasize "waist loss" and metabolic health through dietary and other interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, South Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19148121

Citation

Li, Ming, et al. "Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, Obesity, Physical Activity, and the Metabolic Syndrome in Indigenous Australian Adults." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 17, no. 4, 2009, pp. 809-13.
Li M, Campbell S, McDermott R. Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, obesity, physical activity, and the metabolic syndrome in indigenous Australian adults. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(4):809-13.
Li, M., Campbell, S., & McDermott, R. (2009). Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, obesity, physical activity, and the metabolic syndrome in indigenous Australian adults. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 17(4), 809-13. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.617
Li M, Campbell S, McDermott R. Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, Obesity, Physical Activity, and the Metabolic Syndrome in Indigenous Australian Adults. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(4):809-13. PubMed PMID: 19148121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - gamma-Glutamyltransferase, obesity, physical activity, and the metabolic syndrome in indigenous Australian adults. AU - Li,Ming, AU - Campbell,Sandra, AU - McDermott,Robyn, Y1 - 2009/01/15/ PY - 2009/1/17/entrez PY - 2009/1/17/pubmed PY - 2009/6/6/medline SP - 809 EP - 13 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - The aim of this study is to examine the association between obesity, metabolic syndrome, physical activity, and elevated gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) among Indigenous Australian adults who did not drink alcohol. A cross-sectional study of 791 Indigenous adults in rural North Queensland communities was conducted between 1999 and 2001. Measures included serum GGT, fasting glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides; resting blood pressure, BMI, and waist circumference; and self-reported physical activity, alcohol intake, and tobacco smoking. Central obesity measured by waist circumference in this population was significantly associated with elevated GGT independently of lifestyle behaviors (Adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-6.0). Metabolic syndrome (International Diabetes Federation definition) was also strongly associated with increased GGT (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.5-4.6). Habitual physical activity may be slightly protective (OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.5-1.6) in this group, but this was not clearly demonstrated in this study. Prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this population should emphasize "waist loss" and metabolic health through dietary and other interventions. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19148121/gamma_Glutamyltransferase_obesity_physical_activity_and_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_indigenous_Australian_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.617 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -