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Hydrogen cyanide as a biomarker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2009 Feb; 44(2):142-7.PP

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is emitted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in vitro. We hypothesized that exhaled HCN could be measured using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and that concentrations would be higher in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and PA infection than in children with asthma.

METHODS

Children aged 7-17 years with CF (n = 16) or asthma (n = 21) attending outpatient clinics provided breath samples between July and December 2007. HCN was measured using the SIFT-MS Profile 3 instrument. FeNO was measured with a Sievers NOA 280i analyzer. Baseline inter-group differences between HCN and FeNO concentrations were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Children were invited to re-attend fortnightly. Breath samples, spirometry, growth and clinical status were measured at each visit.

RESULTS

There were significant baseline differences in exhaled HCN and FeNO concentrations between the two groups. Children with CF had higher median HCN concentrations than those with asthma: 13.5 parts per billion (ppb) (IQR 8.1-16.5) versus 2.0 ppb (IQR 0.0-4.8) (P < 0.001). Children with CF had lower median FeNO levels compared to children with asthma: 13.4 ppb (IQR 8.9-17.6) versus 57.9 ppb (IQR 34.0-85.7) (P < 0.001). Intra-subject variability was high and significant changes in HCN concentrations were not observed related to changes in lung function or clinical status.

CONCLUSION

This study provides proof of principle that HCN is detectable in the breath of children with CF and is elevated compared to children with asthma. Further studies are required to capture data from acutely unwell children and more accurately delineate responses to treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Academic Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19148935

Citation

Enderby, Beth, et al. "Hydrogen Cyanide as a Biomarker for Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in the Breath of Children With Cystic Fibrosis." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 44, no. 2, 2009, pp. 142-7.
Enderby B, Smith D, Carroll W, et al. Hydrogen cyanide as a biomarker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2009;44(2):142-7.
Enderby, B., Smith, D., Carroll, W., & Lenney, W. (2009). Hydrogen cyanide as a biomarker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis. Pediatric Pulmonology, 44(2), 142-7. https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.20963
Enderby B, et al. Hydrogen Cyanide as a Biomarker for Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in the Breath of Children With Cystic Fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2009;44(2):142-7. PubMed PMID: 19148935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hydrogen cyanide as a biomarker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis. AU - Enderby,Beth, AU - Smith,David, AU - Carroll,W, AU - Lenney,W, PY - 2009/1/17/entrez PY - 2009/1/17/pubmed PY - 2009/6/24/medline SP - 142 EP - 7 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr Pulmonol VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - HYPOTHESIS: Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is emitted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in vitro. We hypothesized that exhaled HCN could be measured using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and that concentrations would be higher in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and PA infection than in children with asthma. METHODS: Children aged 7-17 years with CF (n = 16) or asthma (n = 21) attending outpatient clinics provided breath samples between July and December 2007. HCN was measured using the SIFT-MS Profile 3 instrument. FeNO was measured with a Sievers NOA 280i analyzer. Baseline inter-group differences between HCN and FeNO concentrations were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Children were invited to re-attend fortnightly. Breath samples, spirometry, growth and clinical status were measured at each visit. RESULTS: There were significant baseline differences in exhaled HCN and FeNO concentrations between the two groups. Children with CF had higher median HCN concentrations than those with asthma: 13.5 parts per billion (ppb) (IQR 8.1-16.5) versus 2.0 ppb (IQR 0.0-4.8) (P < 0.001). Children with CF had lower median FeNO levels compared to children with asthma: 13.4 ppb (IQR 8.9-17.6) versus 57.9 ppb (IQR 34.0-85.7) (P < 0.001). Intra-subject variability was high and significant changes in HCN concentrations were not observed related to changes in lung function or clinical status. CONCLUSION: This study provides proof of principle that HCN is detectable in the breath of children with CF and is elevated compared to children with asthma. Further studies are required to capture data from acutely unwell children and more accurately delineate responses to treatment. SN - 1099-0496 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19148935/Hydrogen_cyanide_as_a_biomarker_for_Pseudomonas_aeruginosa_in_the_breath_of_children_with_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.20963 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -