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Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin is associated with subclinical neuropathy in neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients: a prospective study.
J Clin Neurophysiol. 2009 Feb; 26(1):50-3.JC

Abstract

The association between poorly controlled diabetes and higher risk of polyneuropathy is well established. The American Diabetes Association recommends that glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be less than 7%. Most previous studies, which reported HbA1c correlation with polyneuropathy, used higher HbA1c cut points and focused on neurologically symptomatic patients. This study evaluated the correlation of HbA1c levels, using the 7% cut point, with abnormal nerve conduction studies in diabetic patients in the subclinical stage of polyneuropathy. Fifty neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients were included. HbA1c was measured at time of inclusion and 3 months later followed by nerve conduction studies. Univariate and multivariate analyses with logistic regression models were used to study the association of different patient characteristics with abnormal nerve conduction studies. Fifteen women and 35 men were studied. Half of patients had elevated HbA1c and half had HbA1c <7%. Twenty-six patients (52%) had subclinical neuropathy (18 men, 8 women). In multivariate analysis, HbA1c was the most important factor predicting higher risk of subclinical neuropathy [adjusted odds ratio 10.71 (2.49, 46.01), P < 0.005]. Therefore, nerve conduction studies abnormalities commonly exist in diabetic patients in the subclinical stages of polyneuropathy, and are highly correlated to HbA1c levels. Therapies for diabetic neuropathy should target the early stages of the disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan. khalidelsalem@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19151611

Citation

El-Salem, Khalid, et al. "Elevated Glycosylated Hemoglobin Is Associated With Subclinical Neuropathy in Neurologically Asymptomatic Diabetic Patients: a Prospective Study." Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society, vol. 26, no. 1, 2009, pp. 50-3.
El-Salem K, Ammari F, Khader Y, et al. Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin is associated with subclinical neuropathy in neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients: a prospective study. J Clin Neurophysiol. 2009;26(1):50-3.
El-Salem, K., Ammari, F., Khader, Y., & Dhaimat, O. (2009). Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin is associated with subclinical neuropathy in neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients: a prospective study. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society, 26(1), 50-3. https://doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0b013e31819862ee
El-Salem K, et al. Elevated Glycosylated Hemoglobin Is Associated With Subclinical Neuropathy in Neurologically Asymptomatic Diabetic Patients: a Prospective Study. J Clin Neurophysiol. 2009;26(1):50-3. PubMed PMID: 19151611.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin is associated with subclinical neuropathy in neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients: a prospective study. AU - El-Salem,Khalid, AU - Ammari,Fawaz, AU - Khader,Yousef, AU - Dhaimat,Omar, PY - 2009/1/20/entrez PY - 2009/1/20/pubmed PY - 2009/5/19/medline SP - 50 EP - 3 JF - Journal of clinical neurophysiology : official publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society JO - J Clin Neurophysiol VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - The association between poorly controlled diabetes and higher risk of polyneuropathy is well established. The American Diabetes Association recommends that glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be less than 7%. Most previous studies, which reported HbA1c correlation with polyneuropathy, used higher HbA1c cut points and focused on neurologically symptomatic patients. This study evaluated the correlation of HbA1c levels, using the 7% cut point, with abnormal nerve conduction studies in diabetic patients in the subclinical stage of polyneuropathy. Fifty neurologically asymptomatic diabetic patients were included. HbA1c was measured at time of inclusion and 3 months later followed by nerve conduction studies. Univariate and multivariate analyses with logistic regression models were used to study the association of different patient characteristics with abnormal nerve conduction studies. Fifteen women and 35 men were studied. Half of patients had elevated HbA1c and half had HbA1c <7%. Twenty-six patients (52%) had subclinical neuropathy (18 men, 8 women). In multivariate analysis, HbA1c was the most important factor predicting higher risk of subclinical neuropathy [adjusted odds ratio 10.71 (2.49, 46.01), P < 0.005]. Therefore, nerve conduction studies abnormalities commonly exist in diabetic patients in the subclinical stages of polyneuropathy, and are highly correlated to HbA1c levels. Therapies for diabetic neuropathy should target the early stages of the disease. SN - 1537-1603 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19151611/Elevated_glycosylated_hemoglobin_is_associated_with_subclinical_neuropathy_in_neurologically_asymptomatic_diabetic_patients:_a_prospective_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0b013e31819862ee DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -