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Alcohol consumption and transition of mild cognitive impairment to dementia.

Abstract

AIM

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a prodrome for dementia. Alcohol drinking patterns may affect cognitive functions and the effects may accumulate to a significant level at an advanced age. This study investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and risks for dementia in a cohort of elderly patients with MCI.

METHODS

Patients with suspected cognitive impairment were screened. One hundred and seventy-six patients who met the MCI criteria were enrolled. Lifetime and daily alcohol consumptions were assessed at baseline using a self-report questionnaire answered by patients and their caregivers. Patients were classified according to alcohol consumptions as abstainers, light-moderate and heavy drinkers. Global cognitive functions were assessed periodically with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Enrolled patients were followed for 2 years.

RESULTS

Of the 176 patients diagnosed as having MCI, 15 (8.5%) died, 13 (7.4%) were lost to follow up, and 66 (37.5%) developed dementia during follow up. Light-moderate alcohol drinkers had better MMSE performance than abstainers (P < 0.05) and heavy drinkers (P < 0.01) 2 years after MCI diagnosis. Patients who consumed a total of <or=300 kg alcohol prior to MCI diagnosis had less cognitive decline than patients who consumed no (P < 0.05) or >300 kg alcohol (P < 0.01). Heavy drinkers had a higher risk for dementia than abstainers (P < 0.05) and light-moderate drinkers (P < 0.05) 2 years after MCI diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS

A J-shaped relationship may exist between alcohol consumption and cognitive decline in MCI patients. Light-moderate alcohol drinking may be associated with decreased risks for dementia in elderly patients with MCI.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. gelinxu@gmail.com

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    China
    Cognition Disorders
    Cohort Studies
    Dementia
    Disease Progression
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Kaplan-Meier Estimate
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Male
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Tomography, X-Ray Computed

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19154211

    Citation

    Xu, Gelin, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Transition of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia." Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, vol. 63, no. 1, 2009, pp. 43-9.
    Xu G, Liu X, Yin Q, et al. Alcohol consumption and transition of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2009;63(1):43-9.
    Xu, G., Liu, X., Yin, Q., Zhu, W., Zhang, R., & Fan, X. (2009). Alcohol consumption and transition of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 63(1), pp. 43-9. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1819.2008.01904.x.
    Xu G, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Transition of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2009;63(1):43-9. PubMed PMID: 19154211.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and transition of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. AU - Xu,Gelin, AU - Liu,Xinfeng, AU - Yin,Qin, AU - Zhu,Wusheng, AU - Zhang,Renliang, AU - Fan,Xiaobing, PY - 2009/1/22/entrez PY - 2009/1/22/pubmed PY - 2009/4/17/medline SP - 43 EP - 9 JF - Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences JO - Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci. VL - 63 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a prodrome for dementia. Alcohol drinking patterns may affect cognitive functions and the effects may accumulate to a significant level at an advanced age. This study investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and risks for dementia in a cohort of elderly patients with MCI. METHODS: Patients with suspected cognitive impairment were screened. One hundred and seventy-six patients who met the MCI criteria were enrolled. Lifetime and daily alcohol consumptions were assessed at baseline using a self-report questionnaire answered by patients and their caregivers. Patients were classified according to alcohol consumptions as abstainers, light-moderate and heavy drinkers. Global cognitive functions were assessed periodically with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Enrolled patients were followed for 2 years. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients diagnosed as having MCI, 15 (8.5%) died, 13 (7.4%) were lost to follow up, and 66 (37.5%) developed dementia during follow up. Light-moderate alcohol drinkers had better MMSE performance than abstainers (P < 0.05) and heavy drinkers (P < 0.01) 2 years after MCI diagnosis. Patients who consumed a total of <or=300 kg alcohol prior to MCI diagnosis had less cognitive decline than patients who consumed no (P < 0.05) or >300 kg alcohol (P < 0.01). Heavy drinkers had a higher risk for dementia than abstainers (P < 0.05) and light-moderate drinkers (P < 0.05) 2 years after MCI diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: A J-shaped relationship may exist between alcohol consumption and cognitive decline in MCI patients. Light-moderate alcohol drinking may be associated with decreased risks for dementia in elderly patients with MCI. SN - 1440-1819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19154211/Alcohol_consumption_and_transition_of_mild_cognitive_impairment_to_dementia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1819.2008.01904.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -