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Prenatal malnutrition and adult schizophrenia: further evidence from the 1959-1961 Chinese famine.
Schizophr Bull 2009; 35(3):568-76SB

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Evidence from the 1944-1995 Dutch Hunger Winter and the 1959-1961 Chinese famines suggests that those conceived or in early gestation during famines, have a 2-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia in adult life. We tested the hypothesis in a second Chinese population and also determined whether risk differed between urban and rural areas.

METHOD

The risk of schizophrenia was examined in Liuzhou prefecture of Guangxi autonomous region. Rates were compared among those conceived before, during, and after the famine years. Based on the decline in birth rates, we predicted that those born in 1960 and 1961 would have been exposed to the famine during conception or early gestation. All psychiatric case records in Liuzhou psychiatric hospital for the years 1971 through 2001 were examined and clinical/sociodemographic data extracted by psychiatrists blind to exposure status. Data on births and deaths in the famine years were also available, and cumulative mortality was estimated from later demographic surveys. Evidence of famine was verified, and results were adjusted for mortality. Relative risks (RRs) for schizophrenia were calculated for the region as a whole and for urban and rural areas separately.

RESULTS

Mortality-adjusted RR for schizophrenia was 1.5 (1960) and 2.05 (1961), respectively. However, the effect was exclusively from the rural areas RR = 1.68 (1960) and RR = 2.25 (1961).

CONCLUSIONS

We observe a 2-fold increased risk of schizophrenia among those conceived or in early gestation at the height of famine with risk related to severity of famine conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bio-X Life Science Research Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19155344

Citation

Xu, Ming-Qing, et al. "Prenatal Malnutrition and Adult Schizophrenia: Further Evidence From the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine." Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 35, no. 3, 2009, pp. 568-76.
Xu MQ, Sun WS, Liu BX, et al. Prenatal malnutrition and adult schizophrenia: further evidence from the 1959-1961 Chinese famine. Schizophr Bull. 2009;35(3):568-76.
Xu, M. Q., Sun, W. S., Liu, B. X., Feng, G. Y., Yu, L., Yang, L., ... He, L. (2009). Prenatal malnutrition and adult schizophrenia: further evidence from the 1959-1961 Chinese famine. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35(3), pp. 568-76. doi:10.1093/schbul/sbn168.
Xu MQ, et al. Prenatal Malnutrition and Adult Schizophrenia: Further Evidence From the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine. Schizophr Bull. 2009;35(3):568-76. PubMed PMID: 19155344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal malnutrition and adult schizophrenia: further evidence from the 1959-1961 Chinese famine. AU - Xu,Ming-Qing, AU - Sun,Wen-Sheng, AU - Liu,Ben-Xiu, AU - Feng,Guo-Yin, AU - Yu,Lan, AU - Yang,Lawrence, AU - He,Guang, AU - Sham,Pak, AU - Susser,Ezra, AU - St Clair,David, AU - He,Lin, Y1 - 2009/01/20/ PY - 2009/1/22/entrez PY - 2009/1/22/pubmed PY - 2009/6/12/medline SP - 568 EP - 76 JF - Schizophrenia bulletin JO - Schizophr Bull VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Evidence from the 1944-1995 Dutch Hunger Winter and the 1959-1961 Chinese famines suggests that those conceived or in early gestation during famines, have a 2-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia in adult life. We tested the hypothesis in a second Chinese population and also determined whether risk differed between urban and rural areas. METHOD: The risk of schizophrenia was examined in Liuzhou prefecture of Guangxi autonomous region. Rates were compared among those conceived before, during, and after the famine years. Based on the decline in birth rates, we predicted that those born in 1960 and 1961 would have been exposed to the famine during conception or early gestation. All psychiatric case records in Liuzhou psychiatric hospital for the years 1971 through 2001 were examined and clinical/sociodemographic data extracted by psychiatrists blind to exposure status. Data on births and deaths in the famine years were also available, and cumulative mortality was estimated from later demographic surveys. Evidence of famine was verified, and results were adjusted for mortality. Relative risks (RRs) for schizophrenia were calculated for the region as a whole and for urban and rural areas separately. RESULTS: Mortality-adjusted RR for schizophrenia was 1.5 (1960) and 2.05 (1961), respectively. However, the effect was exclusively from the rural areas RR = 1.68 (1960) and RR = 2.25 (1961). CONCLUSIONS: We observe a 2-fold increased risk of schizophrenia among those conceived or in early gestation at the height of famine with risk related to severity of famine conditions. SN - 0586-7614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19155344/Prenatal_malnutrition_and_adult_schizophrenia:_further_evidence_from_the_1959_1961_Chinese_famine_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/schizophreniabulletin/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/schbul/sbn168 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -