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Steady state folate concentrations achieved with 5 compared with 1.1 mg folic acid supplementation among women of childbearing age.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Mar; 89(3):844-52.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Synthetic folic acid (0.4-1.0 mg) consumed during the periconceptional period has been shown to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Women with poor supplement adherence or a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect may need to take higher doses of folic acid (4-5 mg). However, there are limited data on the pharmacokinetics of higher folic acid doses.

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to compare steady state folate concentrations in women of childbearing age who took 5 or 1.1 mg folic acid daily for 30 wk.

DESIGN

Forty nonpregnant women aged between 18 and 45 y, who did not take folic acid supplements, were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either 5 or 1.1 mg folic acid daily for 30 wk. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 6, 12, and 30.

RESULTS

There was no significant difference in baseline RBC folate concentrations between the 2 groups (1121 +/- 410 and 1035 +/- 273 nmol/L for the 5- and 1.1-mg folic acid groups, respectively). Significant differences in RBC folate were detected between groups at weeks 4, 6, 12, and 30. RBC folate concentrations by week 30 were 2339 +/- 782 and 1625 +/- 339 nmol/L for the 5- and 1.1-mg folic acid groups, respectively.

CONCLUSION

The use of 5 mg folic acid among women of childbearing age produced higher blood folate concentrations, with a faster rate of folate accumulation, compared with 1.1 mg folic acid.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19158211

Citation

Nguyen, Patricia, et al. "Steady State Folate Concentrations Achieved With 5 Compared With 1.1 Mg Folic Acid Supplementation Among Women of Childbearing Age." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 3, 2009, pp. 844-52.
Nguyen P, Tam C, O'Connor DL, et al. Steady state folate concentrations achieved with 5 compared with 1.1 mg folic acid supplementation among women of childbearing age. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(3):844-52.
Nguyen, P., Tam, C., O'Connor, D. L., Kapur, B., & Koren, G. (2009). Steady state folate concentrations achieved with 5 compared with 1.1 mg folic acid supplementation among women of childbearing age. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(3), 844-52. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26878
Nguyen P, et al. Steady State Folate Concentrations Achieved With 5 Compared With 1.1 Mg Folic Acid Supplementation Among Women of Childbearing Age. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(3):844-52. PubMed PMID: 19158211.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Steady state folate concentrations achieved with 5 compared with 1.1 mg folic acid supplementation among women of childbearing age. AU - Nguyen,Patricia, AU - Tam,Carolyn, AU - O'Connor,Deborah L, AU - Kapur,Bhushan, AU - Koren,Gideon, Y1 - 2009/01/21/ PY - 2009/1/23/entrez PY - 2009/1/23/pubmed PY - 2009/3/19/medline SP - 844 EP - 52 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 89 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Synthetic folic acid (0.4-1.0 mg) consumed during the periconceptional period has been shown to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Women with poor supplement adherence or a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect may need to take higher doses of folic acid (4-5 mg). However, there are limited data on the pharmacokinetics of higher folic acid doses. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to compare steady state folate concentrations in women of childbearing age who took 5 or 1.1 mg folic acid daily for 30 wk. DESIGN: Forty nonpregnant women aged between 18 and 45 y, who did not take folic acid supplements, were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either 5 or 1.1 mg folic acid daily for 30 wk. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 6, 12, and 30. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in baseline RBC folate concentrations between the 2 groups (1121 +/- 410 and 1035 +/- 273 nmol/L for the 5- and 1.1-mg folic acid groups, respectively). Significant differences in RBC folate were detected between groups at weeks 4, 6, 12, and 30. RBC folate concentrations by week 30 were 2339 +/- 782 and 1625 +/- 339 nmol/L for the 5- and 1.1-mg folic acid groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: The use of 5 mg folic acid among women of childbearing age produced higher blood folate concentrations, with a faster rate of folate accumulation, compared with 1.1 mg folic acid. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19158211/Steady_state_folate_concentrations_achieved_with_5_compared_with_1_1_mg_folic_acid_supplementation_among_women_of_childbearing_age_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26878 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -