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A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults.
J Nutr 2009; 139(3):514-21JN

Abstract

Diets with increased protein and reduced carbohydrates (PRO) are effective for weight loss, but the long-term effect on maintenance is unknown. This study compared changes in body weight and composition and blood lipids after short-term weight loss (4 mo) followed by weight maintenance (8 mo) using moderate PRO or conventional high-carbohydrate (CHO) diets. Participants (age = 45.4 +/- 1.2 y; BMI = 32.6 +/- 0.8 kg/m(2); n = 130) were randomized to 2 energy-restricted diets (-500 kcal/d or -2093 kJ/d): PRO with 1.6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) protein and <170 g/d carbohydrates or CHO with 0.8 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) protein, >220 g/d carbohydrates. At 4 mo, the PRO group had lost 22% more fat mass (FM) (-5.6 +/- 0.4 kg) than the CHO group (-4.6 +/- 0.3 kg) but weight loss did not differ between groups (-8.2 +/- 0.5 kg vs. -7.0 +/- 0.5 kg; P = 0.10). At 12 mo, the PRO group had more participants complete the study (64 vs. 45%, P < 0.05) with greater improvement in body composition; however, weight loss did not differ between groups (-10.4 +/- 1.2 kg vs. -8.4 +/- 0.9 kg; P = 0.18). Using a compliance criterion of participants attaining >10% weight loss, the PRO group had more participants (31 vs. 21%) lose more weight (-16.5 +/- 1.5 vs. -12.3 +/- 0.9 kg; P < 0.01) and FM (-11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. -7.9 +/- 0.7 kg; P < 0.01) than the CHO group. The CHO diet reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol compared with PRO (P < 0.01) at 4 mo, but the effect did not remain at 12 mo. PRO had sustained favorable effects on serum triacylglycerol (TAG), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and TAG:HDL-C compared with CHO at 4 and 12 mo (P < 0.01). The PRO diet was more effective for FM loss and body composition improvement during initial weight loss and long-term maintenance and produced sustained reductions in TAG and increases in HDL-C compared with the CHO diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Illinois, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. dlayman@illinois.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19158228

Citation

Layman, Donald K., et al. "A Moderate-protein Diet Produces Sustained Weight Loss and Long-term Changes in Body Composition and Blood Lipids in Obese Adults." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 139, no. 3, 2009, pp. 514-21.
Layman DK, Evans EM, Erickson D, et al. A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. J Nutr. 2009;139(3):514-21.
Layman, D. K., Evans, E. M., Erickson, D., Seyler, J., Weber, J., Bagshaw, D., ... Kris-Etherton, P. (2009). A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. The Journal of Nutrition, 139(3), pp. 514-21. doi:10.3945/jn.108.099440.
Layman DK, et al. A Moderate-protein Diet Produces Sustained Weight Loss and Long-term Changes in Body Composition and Blood Lipids in Obese Adults. J Nutr. 2009;139(3):514-21. PubMed PMID: 19158228.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. AU - Layman,Donald K, AU - Evans,Ellen M, AU - Erickson,Donna, AU - Seyler,Jennifer, AU - Weber,Judy, AU - Bagshaw,Deborah, AU - Griel,Amy, AU - Psota,Tricia, AU - Kris-Etherton,Penny, Y1 - 2009/01/21/ PY - 2009/1/23/entrez PY - 2009/1/23/pubmed PY - 2009/3/25/medline SP - 514 EP - 21 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 139 IS - 3 N2 - Diets with increased protein and reduced carbohydrates (PRO) are effective for weight loss, but the long-term effect on maintenance is unknown. This study compared changes in body weight and composition and blood lipids after short-term weight loss (4 mo) followed by weight maintenance (8 mo) using moderate PRO or conventional high-carbohydrate (CHO) diets. Participants (age = 45.4 +/- 1.2 y; BMI = 32.6 +/- 0.8 kg/m(2); n = 130) were randomized to 2 energy-restricted diets (-500 kcal/d or -2093 kJ/d): PRO with 1.6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) protein and <170 g/d carbohydrates or CHO with 0.8 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) protein, >220 g/d carbohydrates. At 4 mo, the PRO group had lost 22% more fat mass (FM) (-5.6 +/- 0.4 kg) than the CHO group (-4.6 +/- 0.3 kg) but weight loss did not differ between groups (-8.2 +/- 0.5 kg vs. -7.0 +/- 0.5 kg; P = 0.10). At 12 mo, the PRO group had more participants complete the study (64 vs. 45%, P < 0.05) with greater improvement in body composition; however, weight loss did not differ between groups (-10.4 +/- 1.2 kg vs. -8.4 +/- 0.9 kg; P = 0.18). Using a compliance criterion of participants attaining >10% weight loss, the PRO group had more participants (31 vs. 21%) lose more weight (-16.5 +/- 1.5 vs. -12.3 +/- 0.9 kg; P < 0.01) and FM (-11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. -7.9 +/- 0.7 kg; P < 0.01) than the CHO group. The CHO diet reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol compared with PRO (P < 0.01) at 4 mo, but the effect did not remain at 12 mo. PRO had sustained favorable effects on serum triacylglycerol (TAG), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and TAG:HDL-C compared with CHO at 4 and 12 mo (P < 0.01). The PRO diet was more effective for FM loss and body composition improvement during initial weight loss and long-term maintenance and produced sustained reductions in TAG and increases in HDL-C compared with the CHO diet. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19158228/A_moderate_protein_diet_produces_sustained_weight_loss_and_long_term_changes_in_body_composition_and_blood_lipids_in_obese_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.108.099440 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -