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Traumatic brain injury screening: preliminary findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team.
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2009 Jan-Feb; 24(1):14-23.JH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The objective of this article is to report the proportion of soldiers in a Brigade Combat Team (BCT) with at least 1 clinician-confirmed deployment-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to describe the nature of sequelae associated with such injuries.

PARTICIPANTS

Members of an Army unit (n = 3973) that served in Iraq were screened for history of TBI. Those reporting an injury (n = 1292) were further evaluated regarding sequelae. Of the injuries suffered, 907 were TBIs and 385 were other types of injury. The majority of TBIs sustained were mild.

METHODS

Postdeployment, responses to the Warrior Administered Retrospective Casualty Assessment Tool (WARCAT) facilitated clinical interviews regarding injury history and associated somatic (ie, headache, dizziness, balance) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (ie, irritability, memory). Traumatic brain injury diagnosis was based on the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine mild TBI criteria, which requires an injury event followed by an alteration in consciousness.

RESULTS

A total of 22.8% of soldiers in a BCT returning from Iraq had clinician-confirmed TBI. Those with TBI were significantly more likely to recall somatic and/or neuropsychiatric symptoms immediately postinjury and endorse symptoms at follow-up than were soldiers without a history of deployment-related TBI. A total of 33.4% of soldiers with TBI reported 3 or more symptoms immediately postinjury compared with 7.5% at postdeployment. For soldiers injured without TBI, rates of 3 or more symptoms postinjury and postdeployment were 2.9% and 2.3%, respectively. In those with TBI, headache and dizziness were most frequently reported postinjury, with irritability and memory problems persisting and presenting over time.

CONCLUSION

Following deployment to Iraq, a clinician-confirmed TBI history was identified in 22.8% of soldiers from a BCT. Those with TBI were significantly more likely to report postinjury and postdeployment somatic and/or neuropsychiatric symptoms than those without this injury history. Overall, symptom endorsement decreased over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Deployment Health, Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado 80913, USA. heidi.terrio@amedd.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19158592

Citation

Terrio, Heidi, et al. "Traumatic Brain Injury Screening: Preliminary Findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team." The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, vol. 24, no. 1, 2009, pp. 14-23.
Terrio H, Brenner LA, Ivins BJ, et al. Traumatic brain injury screening: preliminary findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2009;24(1):14-23.
Terrio, H., Brenner, L. A., Ivins, B. J., Cho, J. M., Helmick, K., Schwab, K., Scally, K., Bretthauer, R., & Warden, D. (2009). Traumatic brain injury screening: preliminary findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team. The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 24(1), 14-23. https://doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0b013e31819581d8
Terrio H, et al. Traumatic Brain Injury Screening: Preliminary Findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):14-23. PubMed PMID: 19158592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traumatic brain injury screening: preliminary findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team. AU - Terrio,Heidi, AU - Brenner,Lisa A, AU - Ivins,Brian J, AU - Cho,John M, AU - Helmick,Katherine, AU - Schwab,Karen, AU - Scally,Katherine, AU - Bretthauer,Rick, AU - Warden,Deborah, PY - 2009/1/23/entrez PY - 2009/1/23/pubmed PY - 2009/6/12/medline SP - 14 EP - 23 JF - The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation JO - J Head Trauma Rehabil VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objective of this article is to report the proportion of soldiers in a Brigade Combat Team (BCT) with at least 1 clinician-confirmed deployment-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to describe the nature of sequelae associated with such injuries. PARTICIPANTS: Members of an Army unit (n = 3973) that served in Iraq were screened for history of TBI. Those reporting an injury (n = 1292) were further evaluated regarding sequelae. Of the injuries suffered, 907 were TBIs and 385 were other types of injury. The majority of TBIs sustained were mild. METHODS: Postdeployment, responses to the Warrior Administered Retrospective Casualty Assessment Tool (WARCAT) facilitated clinical interviews regarding injury history and associated somatic (ie, headache, dizziness, balance) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (ie, irritability, memory). Traumatic brain injury diagnosis was based on the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine mild TBI criteria, which requires an injury event followed by an alteration in consciousness. RESULTS: A total of 22.8% of soldiers in a BCT returning from Iraq had clinician-confirmed TBI. Those with TBI were significantly more likely to recall somatic and/or neuropsychiatric symptoms immediately postinjury and endorse symptoms at follow-up than were soldiers without a history of deployment-related TBI. A total of 33.4% of soldiers with TBI reported 3 or more symptoms immediately postinjury compared with 7.5% at postdeployment. For soldiers injured without TBI, rates of 3 or more symptoms postinjury and postdeployment were 2.9% and 2.3%, respectively. In those with TBI, headache and dizziness were most frequently reported postinjury, with irritability and memory problems persisting and presenting over time. CONCLUSION: Following deployment to Iraq, a clinician-confirmed TBI history was identified in 22.8% of soldiers from a BCT. Those with TBI were significantly more likely to report postinjury and postdeployment somatic and/or neuropsychiatric symptoms than those without this injury history. Overall, symptom endorsement decreased over time. SN - 1550-509X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19158592/Traumatic_brain_injury_screening:_preliminary_findings_in_a_US_Army_Brigade_Combat_Team_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0b013e31819581d8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -