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Matrix metalloproteinases and their multiple roles in neurodegenerative diseases.
Lancet Neurol. 2009 Feb; 8(2):205-16.LN

Abstract

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and proteins containing a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) are important in neuroinflammation, and recent studies have linked their actions to neurodegenerative disorders. MMPs act as cell-surface sheddases and can affect cell signalling initiated by growth factors or death receptors. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate metalloproteinase activity. These proteases increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, which can cause oedema, haemorrhage, and cell death. MMPs also participate in tissue repair by promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. In vascular cognitive impairment, MMPs change permeability of the blood-brain barrier and might contribute to white matter damage. MMPs and ADAMs might contribute to the formation and degradation of amyloid proteins in Alzheimer's disease and cause death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. In this Review, by examining the effects of neuroinflammation, we try to understand the role that MMPs might have in neurodegenerative diseases. Therapeutic strategies that use inhibitors of MMPs could represent potential novel treatments for neurological diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. grosenberg@salud.unm.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19161911

Citation

Rosenberg, Gary A.. "Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Multiple Roles in Neurodegenerative Diseases." The Lancet. Neurology, vol. 8, no. 2, 2009, pp. 205-16.
Rosenberg GA. Matrix metalloproteinases and their multiple roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Lancet Neurol. 2009;8(2):205-16.
Rosenberg, G. A. (2009). Matrix metalloproteinases and their multiple roles in neurodegenerative diseases. The Lancet. Neurology, 8(2), 205-16. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(09)70016-X
Rosenberg GA. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Multiple Roles in Neurodegenerative Diseases. Lancet Neurol. 2009;8(2):205-16. PubMed PMID: 19161911.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Matrix metalloproteinases and their multiple roles in neurodegenerative diseases. A1 - Rosenberg,Gary A, PY - 2009/1/24/entrez PY - 2009/1/24/pubmed PY - 2009/3/14/medline SP - 205 EP - 16 JF - The Lancet. Neurology JO - Lancet Neurol VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and proteins containing a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) are important in neuroinflammation, and recent studies have linked their actions to neurodegenerative disorders. MMPs act as cell-surface sheddases and can affect cell signalling initiated by growth factors or death receptors. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate metalloproteinase activity. These proteases increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, which can cause oedema, haemorrhage, and cell death. MMPs also participate in tissue repair by promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. In vascular cognitive impairment, MMPs change permeability of the blood-brain barrier and might contribute to white matter damage. MMPs and ADAMs might contribute to the formation and degradation of amyloid proteins in Alzheimer's disease and cause death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. In this Review, by examining the effects of neuroinflammation, we try to understand the role that MMPs might have in neurodegenerative diseases. Therapeutic strategies that use inhibitors of MMPs could represent potential novel treatments for neurological diseases. SN - 1474-4422 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19161911/Matrix_metalloproteinases_and_their_multiple_roles_in_neurodegenerative_diseases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1474-4422(09)70016-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -