Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Alcohol drinking and cardiovascular risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption.
Am J Cardiol. 2009 Feb 01; 103(3):361-8.AJ

Abstract

Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with lower coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, data on the CAD risk associated with high alcohol consumption are conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of heavier drinking on 10-year CAD risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption. In a population-based study of 5,769 adults (aged 35 to 75 years) without cardiovascular disease in Switzerland, 1-week alcohol consumption was categorized as 0, 1 to 6, 7 to 13, 14 to 20, 21 to 27, 28 to 34, and > or =35 drinks/week or as nondrinkers (0 drinks/week), moderate (1 to 13 drinks/week), high (14 to 34 drinks/week), and very high (> or =35 drinks/week). Blood pressure and lipids were measured, and 10-year CAD risk was calculated according to the Framingham risk score. Seventy-three percent (n = 4,214) of the participants consumed alcohol; 16% (n = 909) were high drinkers and 2% (n = 119) very high drinkers. In multivariate analysis, increasing alcohol consumption was associated with higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (from a mean +/- SE of 1.57 +/- 0.01 mmol/L in nondrinkers to 1.88 +/- 0.03 mmol/L in very high drinkers); triglycerides (1.17 +/- 1.01 to 1.32 +/- 1.05 mmol/L), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (127.4 +/- 0.4 to 132.2 +/- 1.4 mm Hg and 78.7 +/- 0.3 to 81.7 +/- 0.9 mm Hg, respectively) (all p values for trend <0.001). Ten-year CAD risk increased from 4.31 +/- 0.10% to 4.90 +/- 0.37% (p = 0.03) with alcohol use, with a J-shaped relation. Increasing wine consumption was more related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, whereas beer and spirits were related to increased triglyceride levels. In conclusion, as measured by 10-year CAD risk, the protective effect of alcohol consumption disappears in very high drinkers, because the beneficial increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is offset by the increases in blood pressure levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19166690

Citation

Foerster, Maryline, et al. "Alcohol Drinking and Cardiovascular Risk in a Population With High Mean Alcohol Consumption." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 103, no. 3, 2009, pp. 361-8.
Foerster M, Marques-Vidal P, Gmel G, et al. Alcohol drinking and cardiovascular risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption. Am J Cardiol. 2009;103(3):361-8.
Foerster, M., Marques-Vidal, P., Gmel, G., Daeppen, J. B., Cornuz, J., Hayoz, D., Pécoud, A., Mooser, V., Waeber, G., Vollenweider, P., Paccaud, F., & Rodondi, N. (2009). Alcohol drinking and cardiovascular risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption. The American Journal of Cardiology, 103(3), 361-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.09.089
Foerster M, et al. Alcohol Drinking and Cardiovascular Risk in a Population With High Mean Alcohol Consumption. Am J Cardiol. 2009 Feb 1;103(3):361-8. PubMed PMID: 19166690.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol drinking and cardiovascular risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption. AU - Foerster,Maryline, AU - Marques-Vidal,Pedro, AU - Gmel,Gerhard, AU - Daeppen,Jean-Bernard, AU - Cornuz,Jacques, AU - Hayoz,Daniel, AU - Pécoud,Alain, AU - Mooser,Vincent, AU - Waeber,Gérard, AU - Vollenweider,Peter, AU - Paccaud,Fred, AU - Rodondi,Nicolas, Y1 - 2008/11/17/ PY - 2008/07/10/received PY - 2008/09/12/revised PY - 2008/09/12/accepted PY - 2009/1/27/entrez PY - 2009/1/27/pubmed PY - 2009/2/12/medline SP - 361 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am. J. Cardiol. VL - 103 IS - 3 N2 - Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with lower coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, data on the CAD risk associated with high alcohol consumption are conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of heavier drinking on 10-year CAD risk in a population with high mean alcohol consumption. In a population-based study of 5,769 adults (aged 35 to 75 years) without cardiovascular disease in Switzerland, 1-week alcohol consumption was categorized as 0, 1 to 6, 7 to 13, 14 to 20, 21 to 27, 28 to 34, and > or =35 drinks/week or as nondrinkers (0 drinks/week), moderate (1 to 13 drinks/week), high (14 to 34 drinks/week), and very high (> or =35 drinks/week). Blood pressure and lipids were measured, and 10-year CAD risk was calculated according to the Framingham risk score. Seventy-three percent (n = 4,214) of the participants consumed alcohol; 16% (n = 909) were high drinkers and 2% (n = 119) very high drinkers. In multivariate analysis, increasing alcohol consumption was associated with higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (from a mean +/- SE of 1.57 +/- 0.01 mmol/L in nondrinkers to 1.88 +/- 0.03 mmol/L in very high drinkers); triglycerides (1.17 +/- 1.01 to 1.32 +/- 1.05 mmol/L), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (127.4 +/- 0.4 to 132.2 +/- 1.4 mm Hg and 78.7 +/- 0.3 to 81.7 +/- 0.9 mm Hg, respectively) (all p values for trend <0.001). Ten-year CAD risk increased from 4.31 +/- 0.10% to 4.90 +/- 0.37% (p = 0.03) with alcohol use, with a J-shaped relation. Increasing wine consumption was more related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, whereas beer and spirits were related to increased triglyceride levels. In conclusion, as measured by 10-year CAD risk, the protective effect of alcohol consumption disappears in very high drinkers, because the beneficial increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is offset by the increases in blood pressure levels. SN - 1879-1913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19166690/Alcohol_drinking_and_cardiovascular_risk_in_a_population_with_high_mean_alcohol_consumption_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(08)01705-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -