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The influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index at age 24 months.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb; 109(2):218-25.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Obesity rates in preschool-aged children are greatest among Latinos. Studies of the relationship of acculturation to obesity among Latino immigrants have primarily focused on adults and adolescents. We examined the influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index (BMI) at age 24 and 36 months among predominantly Latino, low-income mother-child pairs enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

DESIGN AND METHODS

Maternal characteristics were obtained from interviewer-administered surveys conducted in English or Spanish at 6 to 20 weeks postpartum among 679 participants in a randomized controlled trial of a health promotion intervention in two urban areas in the Northeast. Acculturation measures included: nativity (born in the United States vs foreign born), parents' nativity, years of US residence (<8 years vs > or =8 years), and exclusive use of native language vs nonexclusive use (mixed or English only). Following repeated mailings and telephone calls requesting permission to obtain their child's height and weight from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children records, informed consent was obtained from 108 mothers. Multivariable linear regression models of maternal acculturation and child BMI z score at age 24 months and age 36 months were estimated among all mother-child pairs and within immigrant-only mother-child pairs, adjusting for relevant maternal characteristics.

RESULTS

At age 24 months, children of mothers with exclusive use of native language had higher BMI z scores compared to children of mothers with nonexclusive use among 91 mother-child pairs (beta=.74, P=0.02) and within 63 immigrant-only mother-child pairs (beta=.92, P=0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

Exclusive use of native language was associated with greater BMI in children as young as age 24 months. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which mothers' language acculturation may affect proximal determinants of energy balance in preschool children, including breastfeeding practices, dietary intake, and physical activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oncological Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA. katarina.sussner@mssm.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19167948

Citation

Sussner, Katarina M., et al. "The Influence of Maternal Acculturation On Child Body Mass Index at Age 24 Months." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 2, 2009, pp. 218-25.
Sussner KM, Lindsay AC, Peterson KE. The influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index at age 24 months. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(2):218-25.
Sussner, K. M., Lindsay, A. C., & Peterson, K. E. (2009). The influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index at age 24 months. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(2), 218-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.056
Sussner KM, Lindsay AC, Peterson KE. The Influence of Maternal Acculturation On Child Body Mass Index at Age 24 Months. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(2):218-25. PubMed PMID: 19167948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index at age 24 months. AU - Sussner,Katarina M, AU - Lindsay,Ana C, AU - Peterson,Karen E, PY - 2007/10/11/received PY - 2008/09/09/accepted PY - 2009/1/27/entrez PY - 2009/1/27/pubmed PY - 2009/3/17/medline SP - 218 EP - 25 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Obesity rates in preschool-aged children are greatest among Latinos. Studies of the relationship of acculturation to obesity among Latino immigrants have primarily focused on adults and adolescents. We examined the influence of maternal acculturation on child body mass index (BMI) at age 24 and 36 months among predominantly Latino, low-income mother-child pairs enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. DESIGN AND METHODS: Maternal characteristics were obtained from interviewer-administered surveys conducted in English or Spanish at 6 to 20 weeks postpartum among 679 participants in a randomized controlled trial of a health promotion intervention in two urban areas in the Northeast. Acculturation measures included: nativity (born in the United States vs foreign born), parents' nativity, years of US residence (<8 years vs > or =8 years), and exclusive use of native language vs nonexclusive use (mixed or English only). Following repeated mailings and telephone calls requesting permission to obtain their child's height and weight from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children records, informed consent was obtained from 108 mothers. Multivariable linear regression models of maternal acculturation and child BMI z score at age 24 months and age 36 months were estimated among all mother-child pairs and within immigrant-only mother-child pairs, adjusting for relevant maternal characteristics. RESULTS: At age 24 months, children of mothers with exclusive use of native language had higher BMI z scores compared to children of mothers with nonexclusive use among 91 mother-child pairs (beta=.74, P=0.02) and within 63 immigrant-only mother-child pairs (beta=.92, P=0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Exclusive use of native language was associated with greater BMI in children as young as age 24 months. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which mothers' language acculturation may affect proximal determinants of energy balance in preschool children, including breastfeeding practices, dietary intake, and physical activity. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19167948/The_influence_of_maternal_acculturation_on_child_body_mass_index_at_age_24_months_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(08)02049-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -