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Urinary isoflavones and their metabolites validate the dietary isoflavone intakes in US adults.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb; 109(2):245-54.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Isoflavones are derived from dietary sources and considered to promote health by preventing the onset of such chronic diseases as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. Valid and reliable estimation of isoflavone intake is a prerequisite to establishing biological functions of isoflavones on health risks.

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to validate the approach of estimating dietary isoflavone intake with respective urinary isoflavone concentrations in US adults.

DESIGN

Data from the US Department of Agriculture isoflavone database and dietary recalls of 2,908 US adults with urinary isoflavone data in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used.

RESULTS

Dietary isoflavone was consumed by only 35% of adults in a day with an average intake of 3.1 mg/day, which resulted in a mean intake of 1.0 mg/day for all US adults. The isoflavone intakes were from genistein (55%), diadzein (35%), glycitein (7%), biochanin A (2%), and formononetin (2%). Both daily total and energy adjusted isoflavone intake differed by race/ethnicity subgroups (P<0.05) and was associated positively with income (P<0.01) and inversely with body mass index (P<0.05). Geometric mean urinary isoflavone concentration was 5.0 ng/mL among isoflavone consumers and the urinary genistein and daidzein excretion correlated with their isoflavone intake levels (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

In large population-based studies, estimated dietary isoflavone intake can be validated by urinary isoflavones. Further studies are needed at an individual level to validate dietary isoflavone intake by urinary isoflavone concentration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-4017, USA. ock.chun@uconn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19167951

Citation

Chun, Ock Kyoung, et al. "Urinary Isoflavones and Their Metabolites Validate the Dietary Isoflavone Intakes in US Adults." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 2, 2009, pp. 245-54.
Chun OK, Chung SJ, Song WO. Urinary isoflavones and their metabolites validate the dietary isoflavone intakes in US adults. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(2):245-54.
Chun, O. K., Chung, S. J., & Song, W. O. (2009). Urinary isoflavones and their metabolites validate the dietary isoflavone intakes in US adults. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(2), 245-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.055
Chun OK, Chung SJ, Song WO. Urinary Isoflavones and Their Metabolites Validate the Dietary Isoflavone Intakes in US Adults. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(2):245-54. PubMed PMID: 19167951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary isoflavones and their metabolites validate the dietary isoflavone intakes in US adults. AU - Chun,Ock Kyoung, AU - Chung,Sang Jin, AU - Song,Won O, PY - 2007/10/21/received PY - 2008/07/24/accepted PY - 2009/1/27/entrez PY - 2009/1/27/pubmed PY - 2009/3/17/medline SP - 245 EP - 54 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Isoflavones are derived from dietary sources and considered to promote health by preventing the onset of such chronic diseases as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. Valid and reliable estimation of isoflavone intake is a prerequisite to establishing biological functions of isoflavones on health risks. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to validate the approach of estimating dietary isoflavone intake with respective urinary isoflavone concentrations in US adults. DESIGN: Data from the US Department of Agriculture isoflavone database and dietary recalls of 2,908 US adults with urinary isoflavone data in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. RESULTS: Dietary isoflavone was consumed by only 35% of adults in a day with an average intake of 3.1 mg/day, which resulted in a mean intake of 1.0 mg/day for all US adults. The isoflavone intakes were from genistein (55%), diadzein (35%), glycitein (7%), biochanin A (2%), and formononetin (2%). Both daily total and energy adjusted isoflavone intake differed by race/ethnicity subgroups (P<0.05) and was associated positively with income (P<0.01) and inversely with body mass index (P<0.05). Geometric mean urinary isoflavone concentration was 5.0 ng/mL among isoflavone consumers and the urinary genistein and daidzein excretion correlated with their isoflavone intake levels (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In large population-based studies, estimated dietary isoflavone intake can be validated by urinary isoflavones. Further studies are needed at an individual level to validate dietary isoflavone intake by urinary isoflavone concentration. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19167951/Urinary_isoflavones_and_their_metabolites_validate_the_dietary_isoflavone_intakes_in_US_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(08)02048-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -