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Dietary calcium does not exacerbate phytate inhibition of zinc absorption by women from conventional diets.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Mar; 89(3):839-43.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although calcium inhibits zinc bioavailability in rats, especially from high-phytate diets, the effect of calcium on zinc absorption by humans from practical diets remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to test the inhibitory effect of dietary calcium, in Western diets with high and low phytate content, on zinc absorption.

DESIGN

Using a 2 x 2 factorial design, zinc absorption was determined in 10 healthy women from 1-d diets with moderate and high calcium contents of approximately 700 and 1800 mg/d and low and high phytate contents of approximately 440 and 1800 mg/d. Absorption was measured by using extrinsically added (65)Zn and subsequent whole-body scintillation counting.

RESULTS

Mean (+/-SE) fractional zinc absorption was 32.8 +/- 2.3% from the moderate-calcium, low-phytate diet; 26.9 +/- 2.4% from the moderate-calcium, high-phytate diet; 39.4 +/- 2.4% from the high-calcium, low-phytate diet; and 26.2 +/- 2.3% from the high-calcium, high-phytate diet. The respective values for absolute zinc absorption were 3.8 +/- 0.3, 3.0 +/- 0.3, 4.5 +/- 0.3, and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mg/d. Phytate significantly reduced fractional zinc absorption by approximately 10 percentage points and reduced absolute zinc absorption by 25%, or approximately 1 mg/d. Differences in dietary calcium did not affect zinc absorption, regardless of a high or low dietary phytate content.

CONCLUSIONS

In healthy women consuming 1-d menus of ordinary foods (some fortified with calcium), dietary phytate reduces zinc absorption, but calcium does not impair zinc absorption, regardless of whether dietary phytate is low or high.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9034, USA. janetrhunt@gmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19176739

Citation

Hunt, Janet R., and Jeannemarie M. Beiseigel. "Dietary Calcium Does Not Exacerbate Phytate Inhibition of Zinc Absorption By Women From Conventional Diets." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 3, 2009, pp. 839-43.
Hunt JR, Beiseigel JM. Dietary calcium does not exacerbate phytate inhibition of zinc absorption by women from conventional diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(3):839-43.
Hunt, J. R., & Beiseigel, J. M. (2009). Dietary calcium does not exacerbate phytate inhibition of zinc absorption by women from conventional diets. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(3), 839-43. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27175
Hunt JR, Beiseigel JM. Dietary Calcium Does Not Exacerbate Phytate Inhibition of Zinc Absorption By Women From Conventional Diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(3):839-43. PubMed PMID: 19176739.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary calcium does not exacerbate phytate inhibition of zinc absorption by women from conventional diets. AU - Hunt,Janet R, AU - Beiseigel,Jeannemarie M, Y1 - 2009/01/28/ PY - 2009/1/30/entrez PY - 2009/1/30/pubmed PY - 2009/3/19/medline SP - 839 EP - 43 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 89 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although calcium inhibits zinc bioavailability in rats, especially from high-phytate diets, the effect of calcium on zinc absorption by humans from practical diets remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to test the inhibitory effect of dietary calcium, in Western diets with high and low phytate content, on zinc absorption. DESIGN: Using a 2 x 2 factorial design, zinc absorption was determined in 10 healthy women from 1-d diets with moderate and high calcium contents of approximately 700 and 1800 mg/d and low and high phytate contents of approximately 440 and 1800 mg/d. Absorption was measured by using extrinsically added (65)Zn and subsequent whole-body scintillation counting. RESULTS: Mean (+/-SE) fractional zinc absorption was 32.8 +/- 2.3% from the moderate-calcium, low-phytate diet; 26.9 +/- 2.4% from the moderate-calcium, high-phytate diet; 39.4 +/- 2.4% from the high-calcium, low-phytate diet; and 26.2 +/- 2.3% from the high-calcium, high-phytate diet. The respective values for absolute zinc absorption were 3.8 +/- 0.3, 3.0 +/- 0.3, 4.5 +/- 0.3, and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mg/d. Phytate significantly reduced fractional zinc absorption by approximately 10 percentage points and reduced absolute zinc absorption by 25%, or approximately 1 mg/d. Differences in dietary calcium did not affect zinc absorption, regardless of a high or low dietary phytate content. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy women consuming 1-d menus of ordinary foods (some fortified with calcium), dietary phytate reduces zinc absorption, but calcium does not impair zinc absorption, regardless of whether dietary phytate is low or high. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19176739/Dietary_calcium_does_not_exacerbate_phytate_inhibition_of_zinc_absorption_by_women_from_conventional_diets_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27175 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -