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[Morbidity and mortality of patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome transferred in intensive care].
Presse Med. 2009 Jun; 38(6):872-80.PM

Abstract

CONTEXT

During pregnancy, the two leading causes of admission in intensive care are preeclampsia and obstetric haemorrhage. However, there are few studies about preeclamptic patients admitted in intensive care. Our purpose was to determine the outcome of pregnancies with preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome admitted in intensive care.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective study between March 1996 and April 2005 in a level III maternity. 533 patients were managed with preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome during this period. We compared patients admitted in intensive care with patients who did not require admission in intensive care.

RESULTS

Sixty six patients (12,4%) with preeclampsia and/or HELLP were admitted in intensive care. Severe HELLP syndrome, eclampsia, neurological troubles and acute pulmonary oedema were the four leading causes of admission. The mean duration of admission was 3, 2+/-2,9 days. Mean age of the patients (28, 2+/-5,8 vs. 29,0+/-5,8 years, NS) and number of primiparous (71, 2% vs 66,6%, NS) were similar between the two groups. The mean gestational age of delivery was reduced when patients were needed admission in intensive care (29,8+/-3,9 weeks of gestation versus 32,5+/-4,4, p<0,001). 77, 3% of babies survived in the intensive care group compared with 90,4% in the other group (p<0,01).

CONCLUSION

The short-term outcome of patients admitted in intensive care for preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome is generally good. However, neonatal morbidity and mortality remained important when women needed management in intensive care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pôle d'Obstétrique, Hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, F-59037 Lille Cedex, France. ethelsabbah@yahoo.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

19186027

Citation

Sabbah-Briffaut, Ethel, et al. "[Morbidity and Mortality of Patients With Preeclampsia or HELLP Syndrome Transferred in Intensive Care]." Presse Medicale (Paris, France : 1983), vol. 38, no. 6, 2009, pp. 872-80.
Sabbah-Briffaut E, Bourzoufi K, Fourrier F, et al. [Morbidity and mortality of patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome transferred in intensive care]. Presse Med. 2009;38(6):872-80.
Sabbah-Briffaut, E., Bourzoufi, K., Fourrier, F., Subtil, D., Houfflin-Debarge, V., & Deruelle, P. (2009). [Morbidity and mortality of patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome transferred in intensive care]. Presse Medicale (Paris, France : 1983), 38(6), 872-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lpm.2008.12.021
Sabbah-Briffaut E, et al. [Morbidity and Mortality of Patients With Preeclampsia or HELLP Syndrome Transferred in Intensive Care]. Presse Med. 2009;38(6):872-80. PubMed PMID: 19186027.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Morbidity and mortality of patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome transferred in intensive care]. AU - Sabbah-Briffaut,Ethel, AU - Bourzoufi,Karim, AU - Fourrier,François, AU - Subtil,Damien, AU - Houfflin-Debarge,Véronique, AU - Deruelle,Philippe, Y1 - 2009/01/30/ PY - 2008/04/10/received PY - 2008/11/26/revised PY - 2008/12/15/accepted PY - 2009/2/3/entrez PY - 2009/2/3/pubmed PY - 2009/6/20/medline SP - 872 EP - 80 JF - Presse medicale (Paris, France : 1983) JO - Presse Med VL - 38 IS - 6 N2 - CONTEXT: During pregnancy, the two leading causes of admission in intensive care are preeclampsia and obstetric haemorrhage. However, there are few studies about preeclamptic patients admitted in intensive care. Our purpose was to determine the outcome of pregnancies with preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome admitted in intensive care. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study between March 1996 and April 2005 in a level III maternity. 533 patients were managed with preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome during this period. We compared patients admitted in intensive care with patients who did not require admission in intensive care. RESULTS: Sixty six patients (12,4%) with preeclampsia and/or HELLP were admitted in intensive care. Severe HELLP syndrome, eclampsia, neurological troubles and acute pulmonary oedema were the four leading causes of admission. The mean duration of admission was 3, 2+/-2,9 days. Mean age of the patients (28, 2+/-5,8 vs. 29,0+/-5,8 years, NS) and number of primiparous (71, 2% vs 66,6%, NS) were similar between the two groups. The mean gestational age of delivery was reduced when patients were needed admission in intensive care (29,8+/-3,9 weeks of gestation versus 32,5+/-4,4, p<0,001). 77, 3% of babies survived in the intensive care group compared with 90,4% in the other group (p<0,01). CONCLUSION: The short-term outcome of patients admitted in intensive care for preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome is generally good. However, neonatal morbidity and mortality remained important when women needed management in intensive care. SN - 2213-0276 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19186027/[Morbidity_and_mortality_of_patients_with_preeclampsia_or_HELLP_syndrome_transferred_in_intensive_care]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0755-4982(09)00014-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -