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The role of diet in the management of gout: a comparison of knowledge and attitudes to current evidence.
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2009 Feb; 22(1):3-11.JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence supports dietary modifications in the management of gout. Despite this, the degree of implementation of this evidence by nutrition professionals and rheumatologists and those affected by gout is unknown. The present study aimed to compare usual dietary practices of patients with gout to evidence for dietary management of gout and to investigate whether the knowledge and attitudes of nutrition professionals and rheumatologists reflects current evidence.

METHODS

A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine usual dietary intake of patients with gout, a separate questionnaire examined gout-related dietary modifications (n = 29). Online questionnaires to examine attitudes towards dietary management of gout were completed by nutrition professionals and rheumatologists.

RESULTS

Proportions of participants whose reported intakes were inconsistent with current evidence for the dietary management of gout were: alcohol, n = 14 (48%); beer, n = 18 (62%); seafood, n = 29 (100%); meat, n = 7 (24%); beef/pork/lamb, n = 24 (83%); dairy products, n = 12 (41%); vitamin C supplementation, n = 29 (100%). Of the 61 rheumatologists and 231 nutrition professionals who completed the online survey, the majority considered that weight loss and decreased alcohol intake were important or very important outcomes. Proportions were lower for decreased purine intake. Thirty-four (56%) rheumatologists do not refer patients with gout to dietetic services and, of those who do, the majority refer less than half.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, patients with gout in the present study were not implementing evidence for dietary management of their condition and complex dietary issues were evident.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19192022

Citation

Shulten, P, et al. "The Role of Diet in the Management of Gout: a Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes to Current Evidence." Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, vol. 22, no. 1, 2009, pp. 3-11.
Shulten P, Thomas J, Miller M, et al. The role of diet in the management of gout: a comparison of knowledge and attitudes to current evidence. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2009;22(1):3-11.
Shulten, P., Thomas, J., Miller, M., Smith, M., & Ahern, M. (2009). The role of diet in the management of gout: a comparison of knowledge and attitudes to current evidence. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, 22(1), 3-11. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2008.00928.x
Shulten P, et al. The Role of Diet in the Management of Gout: a Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes to Current Evidence. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2009;22(1):3-11. PubMed PMID: 19192022.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of diet in the management of gout: a comparison of knowledge and attitudes to current evidence. AU - Shulten,P, AU - Thomas,J, AU - Miller,M, AU - Smith,M, AU - Ahern,M, PY - 2009/2/5/entrez PY - 2009/2/5/pubmed PY - 2009/5/12/medline SP - 3 EP - 11 JF - Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association JO - J Hum Nutr Diet VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence supports dietary modifications in the management of gout. Despite this, the degree of implementation of this evidence by nutrition professionals and rheumatologists and those affected by gout is unknown. The present study aimed to compare usual dietary practices of patients with gout to evidence for dietary management of gout and to investigate whether the knowledge and attitudes of nutrition professionals and rheumatologists reflects current evidence. METHODS: A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine usual dietary intake of patients with gout, a separate questionnaire examined gout-related dietary modifications (n = 29). Online questionnaires to examine attitudes towards dietary management of gout were completed by nutrition professionals and rheumatologists. RESULTS: Proportions of participants whose reported intakes were inconsistent with current evidence for the dietary management of gout were: alcohol, n = 14 (48%); beer, n = 18 (62%); seafood, n = 29 (100%); meat, n = 7 (24%); beef/pork/lamb, n = 24 (83%); dairy products, n = 12 (41%); vitamin C supplementation, n = 29 (100%). Of the 61 rheumatologists and 231 nutrition professionals who completed the online survey, the majority considered that weight loss and decreased alcohol intake were important or very important outcomes. Proportions were lower for decreased purine intake. Thirty-four (56%) rheumatologists do not refer patients with gout to dietetic services and, of those who do, the majority refer less than half. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, patients with gout in the present study were not implementing evidence for dietary management of their condition and complex dietary issues were evident. SN - 1365-277X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19192022/The_role_of_diet_in_the_management_of_gout:_a_comparison_of_knowledge_and_attitudes_to_current_evidence_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2008.00928.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -