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The impact of hepatic steatosis on the natural history of chronic hepatitis C infection.
J Viral Hepat. 2009 Jul; 16(7):492-9.JV

Abstract

Since patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) often have hepatic steatosis, this retrospective analysis aimed to assess whether steatosis influences fibrosis progression. We studied 112 HCV RNA positive subjects (median age 44, IQR 39-51 years), who had two liver biopsies performed (median biopsy interval 50, 34-74 months). Fibrosis was staged using the Ishak method and steatosis by the Kleiner system (<5% steatosis = S0, 5-33% = S1, 33-66% = S2, and >66% = S3). The subjects were untreated because they had mild fibrosis (n = 59), declined therapy (n = 48), or had co-existing disease precluding treatment (n = 5). On first liver biopsy, 60 (54%) had S0, 34 (30%) had S1, 12 (11%) had S2, and 6 (5%) had S3. Steatosis was associated with genotype 3, odds ratio 4.8 (95% CI 1.3-16.7, P = 0.02). Twenty-three patients (21%) had disease progression on the second biopsy, defined as an increase in Ishak score by > or =1 stage. On univariate analysis, fibrosis progression was associated with older age (P = 0.004), higher AST (P = 0.04), and steatosis (P = 0.005) but on multivariate analysis, only baseline steatosis was significant, odds ratio 14.3 (2.1-111.1, P = 0.006). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that steatosis impacted on time to progression to both significant fibrosis (Ishak > or =F3) and cirrhosis (Ishak F5-6) (P = 0.001 and P = 0.049, respectively). The finding that steatosis was significantly associated with fibrosis progression indicates that, independent of baseline fibrosis stage, patients should be considered for anti-viral treatment if steatosis is present. Furthermore, strategies to reduce steatosis may have a beneficial effect on fibrosis progression and, therefore, patient outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hepatology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19200134

Citation

Cross, T J S., et al. "The Impact of Hepatic Steatosis On the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection." Journal of Viral Hepatitis, vol. 16, no. 7, 2009, pp. 492-9.
Cross TJ, Quaglia A, Hughes S, et al. The impact of hepatic steatosis on the natural history of chronic hepatitis C infection. J Viral Hepat. 2009;16(7):492-9.
Cross, T. J., Quaglia, A., Hughes, S., Joshi, D., & Harrison, P. M. (2009). The impact of hepatic steatosis on the natural history of chronic hepatitis C infection. Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 16(7), 492-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2893.2009.01098.x
Cross TJ, et al. The Impact of Hepatic Steatosis On the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection. J Viral Hepat. 2009;16(7):492-9. PubMed PMID: 19200134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of hepatic steatosis on the natural history of chronic hepatitis C infection. AU - Cross,T J S, AU - Quaglia,A, AU - Hughes,S, AU - Joshi,D, AU - Harrison,P M, Y1 - 2009/02/05/ PY - 2009/2/10/entrez PY - 2009/2/10/pubmed PY - 2009/8/4/medline SP - 492 EP - 9 JF - Journal of viral hepatitis JO - J Viral Hepat VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - Since patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) often have hepatic steatosis, this retrospective analysis aimed to assess whether steatosis influences fibrosis progression. We studied 112 HCV RNA positive subjects (median age 44, IQR 39-51 years), who had two liver biopsies performed (median biopsy interval 50, 34-74 months). Fibrosis was staged using the Ishak method and steatosis by the Kleiner system (<5% steatosis = S0, 5-33% = S1, 33-66% = S2, and >66% = S3). The subjects were untreated because they had mild fibrosis (n = 59), declined therapy (n = 48), or had co-existing disease precluding treatment (n = 5). On first liver biopsy, 60 (54%) had S0, 34 (30%) had S1, 12 (11%) had S2, and 6 (5%) had S3. Steatosis was associated with genotype 3, odds ratio 4.8 (95% CI 1.3-16.7, P = 0.02). Twenty-three patients (21%) had disease progression on the second biopsy, defined as an increase in Ishak score by > or =1 stage. On univariate analysis, fibrosis progression was associated with older age (P = 0.004), higher AST (P = 0.04), and steatosis (P = 0.005) but on multivariate analysis, only baseline steatosis was significant, odds ratio 14.3 (2.1-111.1, P = 0.006). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that steatosis impacted on time to progression to both significant fibrosis (Ishak > or =F3) and cirrhosis (Ishak F5-6) (P = 0.001 and P = 0.049, respectively). The finding that steatosis was significantly associated with fibrosis progression indicates that, independent of baseline fibrosis stage, patients should be considered for anti-viral treatment if steatosis is present. Furthermore, strategies to reduce steatosis may have a beneficial effect on fibrosis progression and, therefore, patient outcome. SN - 1365-2893 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19200134/The_impact_of_hepatic_steatosis_on_the_natural_history_of_chronic_hepatitis_C_infection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2893.2009.01098.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -