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Viral hepatitis in the aetiogenesis of jaundice in pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan.
Afr J Med Med Sci. 2007 Jun; 36(2):115-8.AJ

Abstract

Viral hepatitis is common in Nigeria and may present with jaundice in pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of viral hepatitis among other aetiological factors, to the development of jaundice during pregnancy. Data on viral hepatitis among gravidae with jaundice in pregnancy over a 10-year period from 1st January 1992 through 31st December 2001 were retrieved and analyzed. Fifty-two cases of jaundice in pregnancy were seen among 16,566 pregnancies registered in the hospital over the 10-year period. Of the 52 cases of jaundice in pregnancy, only 48 case records were retrievable, on which this analysis is based. Viral hepatitis (VH) occurred in 1 in 591.6 pregnancies and was diagnosed in 28 (58.3%) cases of jaundice in pregnancy. Other causes of jaundice were malaria 8 (16.7%), sickle-cell anaemia in pregnancy 6 (12.5%) and sepsis 2 (4.2%). Of the 28 patients with viral hepatitis, 8 (28.5%) were positive for HBsAg. The liver function tests (LFTs) were done in 26 of the 28 patients and it showed hyperbilirubinaemia in 24, 11 had serum albumin >3.5 g/dl. All had spontaneous vaginal delivery with no maternal death. Complications associated with viral hepatitis were, anaemia 14 (50%), intrauterine growth retardation (14.3%), intrauterine foetal death 2 (7.1%), congestive cardiac failure 1 (3.57%) early neonatal death 1 (3.57%) and 2 (7.1%) cases of systemic hypertension. Viral hepatitis contributes significantly to jaundice in pregnancy and there is associated fetal and maternal morbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital/University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. oladokun@comui.edu.ngNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19205572

Citation

Oladokun, A, et al. "Viral Hepatitis in the Aetiogenesis of Jaundice in Pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan." African Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, vol. 36, no. 2, 2007, pp. 115-8.
Oladokun A, Otegbayo JA, Adeniyi AA. Viral hepatitis in the aetiogenesis of jaundice in pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Afr J Med Med Sci. 2007;36(2):115-8.
Oladokun, A., Otegbayo, J. A., & Adeniyi, A. A. (2007). Viral hepatitis in the aetiogenesis of jaundice in pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. African Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, 36(2), 115-8.
Oladokun A, Otegbayo JA, Adeniyi AA. Viral Hepatitis in the Aetiogenesis of Jaundice in Pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Afr J Med Med Sci. 2007;36(2):115-8. PubMed PMID: 19205572.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viral hepatitis in the aetiogenesis of jaundice in pregnancy at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. AU - Oladokun,A, AU - Otegbayo,J A, AU - Adeniyi,A A, PY - 2009/2/12/entrez PY - 2007/6/1/pubmed PY - 2009/3/13/medline SP - 115 EP - 8 JF - African journal of medicine and medical sciences JO - Afr J Med Med Sci VL - 36 IS - 2 N2 - Viral hepatitis is common in Nigeria and may present with jaundice in pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of viral hepatitis among other aetiological factors, to the development of jaundice during pregnancy. Data on viral hepatitis among gravidae with jaundice in pregnancy over a 10-year period from 1st January 1992 through 31st December 2001 were retrieved and analyzed. Fifty-two cases of jaundice in pregnancy were seen among 16,566 pregnancies registered in the hospital over the 10-year period. Of the 52 cases of jaundice in pregnancy, only 48 case records were retrievable, on which this analysis is based. Viral hepatitis (VH) occurred in 1 in 591.6 pregnancies and was diagnosed in 28 (58.3%) cases of jaundice in pregnancy. Other causes of jaundice were malaria 8 (16.7%), sickle-cell anaemia in pregnancy 6 (12.5%) and sepsis 2 (4.2%). Of the 28 patients with viral hepatitis, 8 (28.5%) were positive for HBsAg. The liver function tests (LFTs) were done in 26 of the 28 patients and it showed hyperbilirubinaemia in 24, 11 had serum albumin >3.5 g/dl. All had spontaneous vaginal delivery with no maternal death. Complications associated with viral hepatitis were, anaemia 14 (50%), intrauterine growth retardation (14.3%), intrauterine foetal death 2 (7.1%), congestive cardiac failure 1 (3.57%) early neonatal death 1 (3.57%) and 2 (7.1%) cases of systemic hypertension. Viral hepatitis contributes significantly to jaundice in pregnancy and there is associated fetal and maternal morbidity. SN - 0309-3913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19205572/Viral_hepatitis_in_the_aetiogenesis_of_jaundice_in_pregnancy_at_the_University_College_Hospital_Ibadan_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -