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Predictive impact of electrolyte abnormalities on the admission outcome and survival of palliative care cancer referrals.
J Palliat Med. 2009 Feb; 12(2):177-80.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Electrolyte abnormalities are common among patients with advanced cancer. Our aim was to estimate the prognostic significance of such abnormalities in a palliative care setting.

METHODS

A retrospective review of the medical records of inpatients with cancer referred to palliative care over a 25-month period. The five electrolytes studied were potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. The prognostic impact of related abnormalities on admission outcome and overall survival was estimated in univariate analysis.

RESULTS

From 866 new cancer referrals, 259 (30%) were eligible for analysis. Abnormalities in sodium, calcium, and magnesium levels were associated with a significant difference in inpatient death rates (p = 0.004, 0.001 and 0.04, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.0008 and 0.0008, and < 0.0001, respectively). The status of potassium and phosphate had no significant impact on admission outcome or overall survival. The three electrolyte abnormalities associated with the highest inpatient death rate were hypercalcemia, hypernatremia, and hypermagnesemia (69%, 68%, and 62%, respectively). Patients with these abnormalities had the shortest median survival as well (12, 8, and 12 days, respectively).

CONCLUSION

Some electrolyte abnormalities may be useful as prognostic indicators in the palliative care setting. However, their prognostic value needs to be investigated in prospective studies and adjusted against proven prognostic indicators.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Palliative Care Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. alsirafy@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19207062

Citation

Alsirafy, Samy A., et al. "Predictive Impact of Electrolyte Abnormalities On the Admission Outcome and Survival of Palliative Care Cancer Referrals." Journal of Palliative Medicine, vol. 12, no. 2, 2009, pp. 177-80.
Alsirafy SA, Sroor MY, Al-Shahri MZ. Predictive impact of electrolyte abnormalities on the admission outcome and survival of palliative care cancer referrals. J Palliat Med. 2009;12(2):177-80.
Alsirafy, S. A., Sroor, M. Y., & Al-Shahri, M. Z. (2009). Predictive impact of electrolyte abnormalities on the admission outcome and survival of palliative care cancer referrals. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 12(2), 177-80. https://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2008.0200
Alsirafy SA, Sroor MY, Al-Shahri MZ. Predictive Impact of Electrolyte Abnormalities On the Admission Outcome and Survival of Palliative Care Cancer Referrals. J Palliat Med. 2009;12(2):177-80. PubMed PMID: 19207062.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictive impact of electrolyte abnormalities on the admission outcome and survival of palliative care cancer referrals. AU - Alsirafy,Samy A, AU - Sroor,Mahmoud Y, AU - Al-Shahri,Mohammad Z, PY - 2009/2/12/entrez PY - 2009/2/12/pubmed PY - 2009/6/11/medline SP - 177 EP - 80 JF - Journal of palliative medicine JO - J Palliat Med VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Electrolyte abnormalities are common among patients with advanced cancer. Our aim was to estimate the prognostic significance of such abnormalities in a palliative care setting. METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records of inpatients with cancer referred to palliative care over a 25-month period. The five electrolytes studied were potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. The prognostic impact of related abnormalities on admission outcome and overall survival was estimated in univariate analysis. RESULTS: From 866 new cancer referrals, 259 (30%) were eligible for analysis. Abnormalities in sodium, calcium, and magnesium levels were associated with a significant difference in inpatient death rates (p = 0.004, 0.001 and 0.04, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.0008 and 0.0008, and < 0.0001, respectively). The status of potassium and phosphate had no significant impact on admission outcome or overall survival. The three electrolyte abnormalities associated with the highest inpatient death rate were hypercalcemia, hypernatremia, and hypermagnesemia (69%, 68%, and 62%, respectively). Patients with these abnormalities had the shortest median survival as well (12, 8, and 12 days, respectively). CONCLUSION: Some electrolyte abnormalities may be useful as prognostic indicators in the palliative care setting. However, their prognostic value needs to be investigated in prospective studies and adjusted against proven prognostic indicators. SN - 1557-7740 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19207062/Predictive_impact_of_electrolyte_abnormalities_on_the_admission_outcome_and_survival_of_palliative_care_cancer_referrals_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jpm.2008.0200?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -