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Impulsivity, attribution and prison bullying: bully-category and perpetrator-victim mutuality.
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Mar-Apr; 32(2):84-91.IJ

Abstract

The current study explores bullying behaviours among adult male prisoners, examining its relationship with aggression attribution and impulsivity. Employed are two separate methods of analysis to determine how this may influence results. Participants were 102 prisoners. All completed a revised version of the Direct and Indirect Prisoner behaviour Checklist (DIPC-R), the Barratt Impulsivity Scale: Version II (BIS-12) and the Expressive Aggression Scale (EXPAGG). Analysis included categorical analysis with prisoners placed into one of four groups (pure bully, pure victim, bully/victim and not-involved), and factorial analysis where perpetration and victimization were assessed as continuous variables and evidence of interactions explored. It was predicted that perpetration would be associated with higher instrumental attributions and higher impulsivity than non-perpetration. It was predicted that a factorial analysis would demonstrate no interactions between perpetration and victimization across aggression variables, questioning the utility of a distinct 'bully-victim' group. Bullies were found to have higher instrumental attribution scores than non-bullies, with no differences for expressive attribution. Victims were more impulsive than non-victims with evidence that perpetration moderated this relationship. A categorical analysis demonstrated that bully/victims were more impulsive, at least in relation to pure bullies. Results suggested that it was the combined effect of indirect and direct aggression which promoted differences between victims and bullies in relation to attribution and impulsivity. Results are discussed with reference to previous research concerning prison bullying, with directions for future research focused on exploration of perpetrator-victim mutuality using a range of variables and distinct methods of analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Durham University, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19211144

Citation

Holland, Dominque, et al. "Impulsivity, Attribution and Prison Bullying: Bully-category and Perpetrator-victim Mutuality." International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, vol. 32, no. 2, 2009, pp. 84-91.
Holland D, Ireland JL, Muncer S. Impulsivity, attribution and prison bullying: bully-category and perpetrator-victim mutuality. Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009;32(2):84-91.
Holland, D., Ireland, J. L., & Muncer, S. (2009). Impulsivity, attribution and prison bullying: bully-category and perpetrator-victim mutuality. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 32(2), 84-91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2009.01.004
Holland D, Ireland JL, Muncer S. Impulsivity, Attribution and Prison Bullying: Bully-category and Perpetrator-victim Mutuality. Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Mar-Apr;32(2):84-91. PubMed PMID: 19211144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impulsivity, attribution and prison bullying: bully-category and perpetrator-victim mutuality. AU - Holland,Dominque, AU - Ireland,Jane L, AU - Muncer,Steven, Y1 - 2009/02/10/ PY - 2009/2/13/entrez PY - 2009/2/13/pubmed PY - 2009/7/16/medline SP - 84 EP - 91 JF - International journal of law and psychiatry JO - Int J Law Psychiatry VL - 32 IS - 2 N2 - The current study explores bullying behaviours among adult male prisoners, examining its relationship with aggression attribution and impulsivity. Employed are two separate methods of analysis to determine how this may influence results. Participants were 102 prisoners. All completed a revised version of the Direct and Indirect Prisoner behaviour Checklist (DIPC-R), the Barratt Impulsivity Scale: Version II (BIS-12) and the Expressive Aggression Scale (EXPAGG). Analysis included categorical analysis with prisoners placed into one of four groups (pure bully, pure victim, bully/victim and not-involved), and factorial analysis where perpetration and victimization were assessed as continuous variables and evidence of interactions explored. It was predicted that perpetration would be associated with higher instrumental attributions and higher impulsivity than non-perpetration. It was predicted that a factorial analysis would demonstrate no interactions between perpetration and victimization across aggression variables, questioning the utility of a distinct 'bully-victim' group. Bullies were found to have higher instrumental attribution scores than non-bullies, with no differences for expressive attribution. Victims were more impulsive than non-victims with evidence that perpetration moderated this relationship. A categorical analysis demonstrated that bully/victims were more impulsive, at least in relation to pure bullies. Results suggested that it was the combined effect of indirect and direct aggression which promoted differences between victims and bullies in relation to attribution and impulsivity. Results are discussed with reference to previous research concerning prison bullying, with directions for future research focused on exploration of perpetrator-victim mutuality using a range of variables and distinct methods of analysis. SN - 1873-6386 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19211144/Impulsivity_attribution_and_prison_bullying:_bully_category_and_perpetrator_victim_mutuality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-2527(09)00004-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -