Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women.
Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89(4):1037-42AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have linked full-calorie sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with greater weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively examined the association between consumption of SSBs and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women.

DESIGN

Women (n = 88,520) from the Nurses' Health Study aged 34-59 y, without previously diagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or diabetes in 1980, were followed from 1980 to 2004. Consumption of SSBs was derived from 7 repeated food-frequency questionnaires administered between 1980 and 2002. Relative risks (RRs) for CHD were calculated by using Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

RESULTS

During 24 y of follow-up, we ascertained 3105 incident cases of CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD). After standard and dietary risk factors were adjusted for, the RRs (and 95% CIs) of CHD according to categories of cumulative average of SSB consumption (<1/mo, 1-4/mo, 2-6/wk, 1/d, and > or =2 servings/d) were 1.0, 0.96 (0.87, 1.06), 1.04 (0.95, 1.14), 1.23 (1.06, 1.43), and 1.35 (1.07, 1.69) (P for trend < 0.001). Additional adjustment for body mass index, energy intake, and incident diabetes attenuated the associations, but they remained significant. Artificially sweetened beverages were not associated with CHD.

CONCLUSION

Regular consumption of SSBs is associated with a higher risk of CHD in women, even after other unhealthful lifestyle or dietary factors are accounted for.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston, MA 02115, USA. fung@simmons.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19211821

Citation

Fung, Teresa T., et al. "Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 4, 2009, pp. 1037-42.
Fung TT, Malik V, Rexrode KM, et al. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(4):1037-42.
Fung, T. T., Malik, V., Rexrode, K. M., Manson, J. E., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2009). Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(4), pp. 1037-42. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.27140.
Fung TT, et al. Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(4):1037-42. PubMed PMID: 19211821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. AU - Fung,Teresa T, AU - Malik,Vasanti, AU - Rexrode,Kathryn M, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2009/02/11/ PY - 2009/2/13/entrez PY - 2009/2/13/pubmed PY - 2009/4/7/medline SP - 1037 EP - 42 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 89 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have linked full-calorie sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with greater weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively examined the association between consumption of SSBs and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. DESIGN: Women (n = 88,520) from the Nurses' Health Study aged 34-59 y, without previously diagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or diabetes in 1980, were followed from 1980 to 2004. Consumption of SSBs was derived from 7 repeated food-frequency questionnaires administered between 1980 and 2002. Relative risks (RRs) for CHD were calculated by using Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for known cardiovascular disease risk factors. RESULTS: During 24 y of follow-up, we ascertained 3105 incident cases of CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD). After standard and dietary risk factors were adjusted for, the RRs (and 95% CIs) of CHD according to categories of cumulative average of SSB consumption (<1/mo, 1-4/mo, 2-6/wk, 1/d, and > or =2 servings/d) were 1.0, 0.96 (0.87, 1.06), 1.04 (0.95, 1.14), 1.23 (1.06, 1.43), and 1.35 (1.07, 1.69) (P for trend < 0.001). Additional adjustment for body mass index, energy intake, and incident diabetes attenuated the associations, but they remained significant. Artificially sweetened beverages were not associated with CHD. CONCLUSION: Regular consumption of SSBs is associated with a higher risk of CHD in women, even after other unhealthful lifestyle or dietary factors are accounted for. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19211821/Sweetened_beverage_consumption_and_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -