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Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian American women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Apr; 89(4):1145-54.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The role of diet as a cause of breast cancer in Asian Americans has not been adequately studied.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian Americans.

DESIGN

This population-based case-control study in Los Angeles County compared dietary patterns between 1248 Asian American women with incident breast cancer and 1148 age-, ethnicity-, and neighborhood-matched controls. The relation between dietary patterns and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was investigated in 2172 postmenopausal control women.

RESULTS

We used a scoring method proposed by Trichopoulou et al (1) and found that adherence to a Mediterranean diet was inversely associated with risk; the odds ratio (OR) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.95) in women with the highest scores (> or = 8; most adherent) compared with those with the lowest scores (0-3; P for trend = 0.009), after adjustment for key covariates. We also used factor analysis and identified 3 dietary patterns (Western-meat/starch, ethnic-meat/starch, and vegetables/soy). In a combined index of the 3 patterns, women who were high consumers of Western and ethnic meat/starch and low consumers of the vegetables/soy diets showed the highest risk (OR: 2.19; 95% CI: 1.40, 3.42; P for trend = 0.0005). SHBG concentrations were 23% lower in women with a high intake of the meat/starch pattern and a low intake of the vegetables/soy pattern than in those with a low intake of the meat/starch pattern and a high intake of the vegetables/soy pattern (P for trend = 0.069).

CONCLUSION

Our results suggest that a diet characterized by a low intake of meat/starches and a high intake of legumes is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in Asian Americans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. annawu@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19211822

Citation

Wu, Anna H., et al. "Dietary Patterns and Breast Cancer Risk in Asian American Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 4, 2009, pp. 1145-54.
Wu AH, Yu MC, Tseng CC, et al. Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian American women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(4):1145-54.
Wu, A. H., Yu, M. C., Tseng, C. C., Stanczyk, F. Z., & Pike, M. C. (2009). Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian American women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(4), 1145-54. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26915
Wu AH, et al. Dietary Patterns and Breast Cancer Risk in Asian American Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(4):1145-54. PubMed PMID: 19211822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian American women. AU - Wu,Anna H, AU - Yu,Mimi C, AU - Tseng,Chiu-Chen, AU - Stanczyk,Frank Z, AU - Pike,Malcolm C, Y1 - 2009/02/11/ PY - 2009/2/13/entrez PY - 2009/2/13/pubmed PY - 2009/4/7/medline SP - 1145 EP - 54 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 89 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The role of diet as a cause of breast cancer in Asian Americans has not been adequately studied. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian Americans. DESIGN: This population-based case-control study in Los Angeles County compared dietary patterns between 1248 Asian American women with incident breast cancer and 1148 age-, ethnicity-, and neighborhood-matched controls. The relation between dietary patterns and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was investigated in 2172 postmenopausal control women. RESULTS: We used a scoring method proposed by Trichopoulou et al (1) and found that adherence to a Mediterranean diet was inversely associated with risk; the odds ratio (OR) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.95) in women with the highest scores (> or = 8; most adherent) compared with those with the lowest scores (0-3; P for trend = 0.009), after adjustment for key covariates. We also used factor analysis and identified 3 dietary patterns (Western-meat/starch, ethnic-meat/starch, and vegetables/soy). In a combined index of the 3 patterns, women who were high consumers of Western and ethnic meat/starch and low consumers of the vegetables/soy diets showed the highest risk (OR: 2.19; 95% CI: 1.40, 3.42; P for trend = 0.0005). SHBG concentrations were 23% lower in women with a high intake of the meat/starch pattern and a low intake of the vegetables/soy pattern than in those with a low intake of the meat/starch pattern and a high intake of the vegetables/soy pattern (P for trend = 0.069). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a diet characterized by a low intake of meat/starches and a high intake of legumes is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in Asian Americans. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19211822/Dietary_patterns_and_breast_cancer_risk_in_Asian_American_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26915 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -