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Binge drinking among U.S. active-duty military personnel.
Am J Prev Med 2009; 36(3):208-17AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Binge drinking (drinking on a single occasion >or=5 drinks for men or >or=4 drinks for women) is a common risk behavior among U.S. adults that is associated with many adverse health and social consequences. However, little is known about binge drinking among active-duty military personnel (ADMP). The objectives of this study were to quantify episodes of binge drinking, to characterize ADMP who binge-drink, and to examine the relationship between binge drinking and related harms.

METHODS

The prevalence of binge drinking and related harms was assessed from responses to the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel (n=16,037), an anonymous, self-administered survey. The data were analyzed in 2007 after the release of the public-use data.

RESULTS

In 2005, a total of 43.2% of ADMP reported past-month binge drinking, resulting in 29.7 episodes per person per year. In all, 67.1% of binge episodes were reported by personnel aged 17-25 years (46.7% of ADMP), and 25.1% of these episodes were reported by underage youth (aged 17-20 years). Heavy drinkers (19.8% of ADMP) were responsible for 71.5% of the binge-drinking episodes and had the highest number of annual per-capita episodes of binge drinking (112.6 episodes). Compared to nonbinge drinkers, binge drinkers were more likely to report alcohol-related harms, including job performance problems (AOR=6.5; 95% CI=4.65, 9.15); alcohol-impaired driving (AOR=4.9; 95% CI=3.68, 6.49); and criminal justice problems (AOR=6.2; 95% CI=4.00, 9.72).

CONCLUSIONS

Binge drinking is common among ADMP and is strongly associated with adverse health and social consequences. Effective interventions (e.g., the enforcement and retainment of the minimum legal drinking age) to prevent binge drinking should be implemented across the military and in conjunction with military communities to discourage binge drinking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alcohol Team, Emerging Investigations and Analytic Methods Branch, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. mstahre@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19215846

Citation

Stahre, Mandy A., et al. "Binge Drinking Among U.S. Active-duty Military Personnel." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 36, no. 3, 2009, pp. 208-17.
Stahre MA, Brewer RD, Fonseca VP, et al. Binge drinking among U.S. active-duty military personnel. Am J Prev Med. 2009;36(3):208-17.
Stahre, M. A., Brewer, R. D., Fonseca, V. P., & Naimi, T. S. (2009). Binge drinking among U.S. active-duty military personnel. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 36(3), pp. 208-17. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2008.10.017.
Stahre MA, et al. Binge Drinking Among U.S. Active-duty Military Personnel. Am J Prev Med. 2009;36(3):208-17. PubMed PMID: 19215846.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Binge drinking among U.S. active-duty military personnel. AU - Stahre,Mandy A, AU - Brewer,Robert D, AU - Fonseca,Vincent P, AU - Naimi,Timothy S, PY - 2008/05/23/received PY - 2008/08/22/revised PY - 2008/10/27/accepted PY - 2009/2/14/entrez PY - 2009/2/14/pubmed PY - 2009/4/11/medline SP - 208 EP - 17 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Binge drinking (drinking on a single occasion >or=5 drinks for men or >or=4 drinks for women) is a common risk behavior among U.S. adults that is associated with many adverse health and social consequences. However, little is known about binge drinking among active-duty military personnel (ADMP). The objectives of this study were to quantify episodes of binge drinking, to characterize ADMP who binge-drink, and to examine the relationship between binge drinking and related harms. METHODS: The prevalence of binge drinking and related harms was assessed from responses to the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel (n=16,037), an anonymous, self-administered survey. The data were analyzed in 2007 after the release of the public-use data. RESULTS: In 2005, a total of 43.2% of ADMP reported past-month binge drinking, resulting in 29.7 episodes per person per year. In all, 67.1% of binge episodes were reported by personnel aged 17-25 years (46.7% of ADMP), and 25.1% of these episodes were reported by underage youth (aged 17-20 years). Heavy drinkers (19.8% of ADMP) were responsible for 71.5% of the binge-drinking episodes and had the highest number of annual per-capita episodes of binge drinking (112.6 episodes). Compared to nonbinge drinkers, binge drinkers were more likely to report alcohol-related harms, including job performance problems (AOR=6.5; 95% CI=4.65, 9.15); alcohol-impaired driving (AOR=4.9; 95% CI=3.68, 6.49); and criminal justice problems (AOR=6.2; 95% CI=4.00, 9.72). CONCLUSIONS: Binge drinking is common among ADMP and is strongly associated with adverse health and social consequences. Effective interventions (e.g., the enforcement and retainment of the minimum legal drinking age) to prevent binge drinking should be implemented across the military and in conjunction with military communities to discourage binge drinking. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19215846/Binge_drinking_among_U_S__active_duty_military_personnel_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(08)00969-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -