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Headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry methodology for analysis of volatile compounds of marine salt as potential origin biomarkers.
Anal Chim Acta. 2009 Mar 09; 635(2):167-74.AC

Abstract

The establishment of geographic origin chemical biomarkers for the marine salt might represent an important improvement to its valorisation. Volatile compounds of marine salt, although never studied, are potential candidates. Thus, the purpose of this work was the development of a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-qMS) methodology to study the volatile composition of marine salt. A 65mum carbowax/divinylbenzene SPME coating fibre was used. Three SPME parameters were optimised: extraction temperature, sample quantity, and presentation mode. An extraction temperature of 60 degrees C and 16g of marine salt in a 120mL glass vial were selected. The study of the effect of sample presentation mode showed that the analysis of an aqueous solution saturated with marine salt allowed higher extraction efficiency than the direct analysis of salt crystals. The dissolution of the salt in water and the consequent effect of salting-out promote the release of the volatile compounds to the headspace, enhancing the sensitivity of SPME for the marine salt volatiles. The optimised methodology was applied to real matrices of marine salt from different geographical origins (Portugal, France, and Cape Verde). The marine salt samples contain ca. 40 volatile compounds, distributed by the chemical groups of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, terpenoids, and norisoprenoids. These compounds seem to arise from three main sources: algae, surrounding bacterial community, and environment pollution. Since these volatile compounds can provide information about the geographic origin and saltpans environment, this study shows that they can be used as chemical biomarkers of marine salt.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19216874

Citation

Silva, Isabel, et al. "Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-quadrupole Mass Spectrometry Methodology for Analysis of Volatile Compounds of Marine Salt as Potential Origin Biomarkers." Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 635, no. 2, 2009, pp. 167-74.
Silva I, Rocha SM, Coimbra MA. Headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry methodology for analysis of volatile compounds of marine salt as potential origin biomarkers. Anal Chim Acta. 2009;635(2):167-74.
Silva, I., Rocha, S. M., & Coimbra, M. A. (2009). Headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry methodology for analysis of volatile compounds of marine salt as potential origin biomarkers. Analytica Chimica Acta, 635(2), 167-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2009.01.011
Silva I, Rocha SM, Coimbra MA. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-quadrupole Mass Spectrometry Methodology for Analysis of Volatile Compounds of Marine Salt as Potential Origin Biomarkers. Anal Chim Acta. 2009 Mar 9;635(2):167-74. PubMed PMID: 19216874.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry methodology for analysis of volatile compounds of marine salt as potential origin biomarkers. AU - Silva,Isabel, AU - Rocha,Sílvia M, AU - Coimbra,Manuel A, Y1 - 2009/01/14/ PY - 2008/10/06/received PY - 2008/12/24/revised PY - 2009/01/05/accepted PY - 2009/2/17/entrez PY - 2009/2/17/pubmed PY - 2009/4/1/medline SP - 167 EP - 74 JF - Analytica chimica acta JO - Anal Chim Acta VL - 635 IS - 2 N2 - The establishment of geographic origin chemical biomarkers for the marine salt might represent an important improvement to its valorisation. Volatile compounds of marine salt, although never studied, are potential candidates. Thus, the purpose of this work was the development of a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-qMS) methodology to study the volatile composition of marine salt. A 65mum carbowax/divinylbenzene SPME coating fibre was used. Three SPME parameters were optimised: extraction temperature, sample quantity, and presentation mode. An extraction temperature of 60 degrees C and 16g of marine salt in a 120mL glass vial were selected. The study of the effect of sample presentation mode showed that the analysis of an aqueous solution saturated with marine salt allowed higher extraction efficiency than the direct analysis of salt crystals. The dissolution of the salt in water and the consequent effect of salting-out promote the release of the volatile compounds to the headspace, enhancing the sensitivity of SPME for the marine salt volatiles. The optimised methodology was applied to real matrices of marine salt from different geographical origins (Portugal, France, and Cape Verde). The marine salt samples contain ca. 40 volatile compounds, distributed by the chemical groups of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, terpenoids, and norisoprenoids. These compounds seem to arise from three main sources: algae, surrounding bacterial community, and environment pollution. Since these volatile compounds can provide information about the geographic origin and saltpans environment, this study shows that they can be used as chemical biomarkers of marine salt. SN - 1873-4324 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19216874/Headspace_solid_phase_microextraction_and_gas_chromatography_quadrupole_mass_spectrometry_methodology_for_analysis_of_volatile_compounds_of_marine_salt_as_potential_origin_biomarkers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-2670(09)00014-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -