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The endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of motor dysfunction.

Abstract

There is evidence that cannabinoid-based medicines that are selective for different targets in the cannabinoid signalling system (e.g. receptors, inactivation mechanism, enzymes) might be beneficial in basal ganglia disorders, namely Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These benefits not only include the alleviation of specific motor symptoms [e.g. choreic movements with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1))/transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonists in HD; bradykinesia with CB(1) antagonists and tremor with CB(1) agonists in PD], but also the delay of disease progression due to the neuroprotective properties demonstrated for cannabinoids (e.g. CB(1) agonists reduce excitotoxicity; CB(2) agonists limit the toxicity of reactive microglia; and antioxidant cannabinoids attenuate oxidative damage). In addition, extensive biochemical, anatomical, physiological and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that: (i) the different elements of the cannabinoid system are abundant in basal ganglia structures and they are affected by these disorders; (ii) the cannabinoid system plays a prominent role in basal ganglia function by modulating the neurotransmitters that operate in the basal ganglia circuits, both in healthy and pathological conditions; and (iii) the activation and/or inhibition of the cannabinoid system is associated with important motor responses that are maintained and even enhanced in conditions of malfunctioning and/or degeneration. In this article we will review the available data regarding the relationship between the cannabinoid system and basal ganglia activity, both in healthy and pathological conditions and will also try to identify future lines of research expected to increase current knowledge about the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting this system in PD, HD and other basal ganglia disorders.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain.

    Source

    British journal of pharmacology 156:7 2009 Apr pg 1029-40

    MeSH

    Basal Ganglia
    Basal Ganglia Diseases
    Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators
    Cannabinoids
    Endocannabinoids
    Humans
    Huntington Disease
    Movement Disorders
    Parkinson Disease
    Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1
    Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB2
    Signal Transduction
    TRPV Cation Channels

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19220290

    Citation

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier. "The Endocannabinoid System as a Target for the Treatment of Motor Dysfunction." British Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 156, no. 7, 2009, pp. 1029-40.
    Fernández-Ruiz J. The endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of motor dysfunction. Br J Pharmacol. 2009;156(7):1029-40.
    Fernández-Ruiz, J. (2009). The endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of motor dysfunction. British Journal of Pharmacology, 156(7), pp. 1029-40. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00088.x.
    Fernández-Ruiz J. The Endocannabinoid System as a Target for the Treatment of Motor Dysfunction. Br J Pharmacol. 2009;156(7):1029-40. PubMed PMID: 19220290.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of motor dysfunction. A1 - Fernández-Ruiz,Javier, Y1 - 2009/02/13/ PY - 2009/2/18/entrez PY - 2009/2/18/pubmed PY - 2009/7/22/medline SP - 1029 EP - 40 JF - British journal of pharmacology JO - Br. J. Pharmacol. VL - 156 IS - 7 N2 - There is evidence that cannabinoid-based medicines that are selective for different targets in the cannabinoid signalling system (e.g. receptors, inactivation mechanism, enzymes) might be beneficial in basal ganglia disorders, namely Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These benefits not only include the alleviation of specific motor symptoms [e.g. choreic movements with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1))/transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonists in HD; bradykinesia with CB(1) antagonists and tremor with CB(1) agonists in PD], but also the delay of disease progression due to the neuroprotective properties demonstrated for cannabinoids (e.g. CB(1) agonists reduce excitotoxicity; CB(2) agonists limit the toxicity of reactive microglia; and antioxidant cannabinoids attenuate oxidative damage). In addition, extensive biochemical, anatomical, physiological and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that: (i) the different elements of the cannabinoid system are abundant in basal ganglia structures and they are affected by these disorders; (ii) the cannabinoid system plays a prominent role in basal ganglia function by modulating the neurotransmitters that operate in the basal ganglia circuits, both in healthy and pathological conditions; and (iii) the activation and/or inhibition of the cannabinoid system is associated with important motor responses that are maintained and even enhanced in conditions of malfunctioning and/or degeneration. In this article we will review the available data regarding the relationship between the cannabinoid system and basal ganglia activity, both in healthy and pathological conditions and will also try to identify future lines of research expected to increase current knowledge about the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting this system in PD, HD and other basal ganglia disorders. SN - 1476-5381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19220290/The_endocannabinoid_system_as_a_target_for_the_treatment_of_motor_dysfunction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00088.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -