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Standardized antibacterial honey (Medihoney) with standard therapy in wound care: randomized clinical trial.
J Adv Nurs 2009; 65(3):565-75JA

Abstract

AIM

This paper is a report of a study to compare a medical grade honey with conventional treatments on the healing rates of wounds healing by secondary intention.

BACKGROUND

There is an increasing body of evidence to support the use of honey to treat wounds, but there is a lack of robust randomized trials on which clinicians can base their clinical judgement.

METHOD

A sample of 105 patients were involved in a single centre, open-label randomized controlled trial in which patients received either a conventional wound dressing or honey. Data were collected between September 2004 and May 2007.

RESULTS

The median time to healing in the honey group was 100 days compared with 140 days in the control group. The healing rate at 12 weeks was equal to 46.2% in the honey group compared with 34.0% in the conventional group, and the difference in the healing rates (95% confidence interval, CI) at 12 weeks between the two groups was 12.2% (-13.6%, 37.9%). The unadjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) from a Cox regression was equal to 1.30 (0.77, 2.19), P = 0.321. When the treatment effect was adjusted for confounding factors (sex, wound type, age and wound area at start of treatment), the hazard ratio increased to 1.51 but was again not statistically significant.

CONCLUSION

Wound area at start of treatment and sex are both highly statistically significant predictors of time to healing. These results support the proposition that there are clinical benefits from using honey in wound care, but further research is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Leg Ulcer Care, Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. val.robson@aintree.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19222654

Citation

Robson, Val, et al. "Standardized Antibacterial Honey (Medihoney) With Standard Therapy in Wound Care: Randomized Clinical Trial." Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 65, no. 3, 2009, pp. 565-75.
Robson V, Dodd S, Thomas S. Standardized antibacterial honey (Medihoney) with standard therapy in wound care: randomized clinical trial. J Adv Nurs. 2009;65(3):565-75.
Robson, V., Dodd, S., & Thomas, S. (2009). Standardized antibacterial honey (Medihoney) with standard therapy in wound care: randomized clinical trial. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65(3), pp. 565-75. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04923.x.
Robson V, Dodd S, Thomas S. Standardized Antibacterial Honey (Medihoney) With Standard Therapy in Wound Care: Randomized Clinical Trial. J Adv Nurs. 2009;65(3):565-75. PubMed PMID: 19222654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Standardized antibacterial honey (Medihoney) with standard therapy in wound care: randomized clinical trial. AU - Robson,Val, AU - Dodd,Susanna, AU - Thomas,Stephen, PY - 2009/2/19/entrez PY - 2009/2/19/pubmed PY - 2009/4/3/medline SP - 565 EP - 75 JF - Journal of advanced nursing JO - J Adv Nurs VL - 65 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: This paper is a report of a study to compare a medical grade honey with conventional treatments on the healing rates of wounds healing by secondary intention. BACKGROUND: There is an increasing body of evidence to support the use of honey to treat wounds, but there is a lack of robust randomized trials on which clinicians can base their clinical judgement. METHOD: A sample of 105 patients were involved in a single centre, open-label randomized controlled trial in which patients received either a conventional wound dressing or honey. Data were collected between September 2004 and May 2007. RESULTS: The median time to healing in the honey group was 100 days compared with 140 days in the control group. The healing rate at 12 weeks was equal to 46.2% in the honey group compared with 34.0% in the conventional group, and the difference in the healing rates (95% confidence interval, CI) at 12 weeks between the two groups was 12.2% (-13.6%, 37.9%). The unadjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) from a Cox regression was equal to 1.30 (0.77, 2.19), P = 0.321. When the treatment effect was adjusted for confounding factors (sex, wound type, age and wound area at start of treatment), the hazard ratio increased to 1.51 but was again not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Wound area at start of treatment and sex are both highly statistically significant predictors of time to healing. These results support the proposition that there are clinical benefits from using honey in wound care, but further research is needed. SN - 1365-2648 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19222654/Standardized_antibacterial_honey__Medihoney__with_standard_therapy_in_wound_care:_randomized_clinical_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04923.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -